Sleep and Breathing

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 11–15 | Cite as

Symptom-Based Prevalence of Sleep Disorders in an Adult Primary Care Population

  • Clete A. Kushida
  • Deborah A. Nichols
  • Richard D. Simon
  • Terry Young
  • John H. Grauke
  • J. B. Britzmann
  • Pamela R. Hyde
  • William C. Dement
Special Topic—Sleep in Primary Care

Abstract

The prevalence of sleep disorders in a primary care physician practice in Moscow, Idaho, was studied between February 7, 1997, and February 6, 1998. This primary care clinic visit population was surveyed for this 1-year period. Every patient above the age of 18 years who visited the Moscow Clinic in this time period was either approached by our on-site researcher during the patient’s clinic visit or contacted via mail. Out of a total of 1249 adult patients who met with our on-site researcher during their clinic visit, 962 (77.0%) completed questionnaires and were interviewed for symptoms of sleep disorders. An additional 292 patients completed mailed questionnaires, resulting in a total of 1254 participants in the study. The percentages of patients in our sample reporting symptoms of the following sleep disorders were insomnia (32.3%), obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (23.6%), and restless legs syndrome (29.3%). This study demonstrates the need for heightened awareness and subsequent diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders in the primary care population.

Keyword

primary care prevalence sleep apnea restless legs syndrome insomnia clinical sleep medicine 

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Copyright information

© Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clete A. Kushida
    • 1
    • 5
  • Deborah A. Nichols
    • 1
  • Richard D. Simon
    • 2
  • Terry Young
    • 3
  • John H. Grauke
    • 4
  • J. B. Britzmann
    • 4
  • Pamela R. Hyde
    • 1
  • William C. Dement
    • 1
  1. 1.Stanford University Center of Excellence for Sleep Disorders
  2. 2.Kathryn Severyns Dement Sleep Disorders CenterSaint Mary’s Medical CenterWalla Walla
  3. 3.University of Wisconsin—MadisonMadison
  4. 4.Moscow ClinicMoscow
  5. 5.Stanford

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