Molecular Imaging and Biology

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 303–313

In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Injected Endothelial Progenitor Cells after Myocardial Infarction in Rats

  • Yuyu Yao
  • Yefei Li
  • Genshan Ma
  • Naifeng Liu
  • Shenghong Ju
  • Jiyang Jin
  • Zhong Chen
  • Chengxing Shen
  • Gaojun Teng
Research Article
  • 386 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to detect and follow transplanted superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Procedures

Infarcted rats were randomized to injections of SPIO-labeled EPCs, unlabeled EPCs, or saline. From 1 day to 8 weeks, in vivo serial MRI was performed for cell tracking.

Results

Labeled cells were visualized as hypointense areas by MRI. The presence of labeled EPCs at 10 days and disappearance of these cells by 8 weeks was confirmed by iron and 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. Co-staining for iron and ED-1 showed that the iron-positive cells were macrophages. EPC implantation significantly elevated vascular endothelial growth factor expression, accompanied by increased capillary and arteriole density in the ischemic myocardium.

Conclusions

At 8 weeks, the transplanted EPCs were not present and the enhanced MRI signals arose from macrophages. However, both EPCs enhanced cardiac function. The major mechanism of cardiac improvement appears to be paracrine pathways of the engrafted EPCs.

Key words

In vivo tracking Magnetic resonance imaging Endothelial progenitor cells SPIO Myocardial infarction 

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Copyright information

© Academy of Molecular Imaging and Society for Molecular Imaging 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuyu Yao
    • 1
  • Yefei Li
    • 1
  • Genshan Ma
    • 1
  • Naifeng Liu
    • 1
  • Shenghong Ju
    • 2
  • Jiyang Jin
    • 2
  • Zhong Chen
    • 1
  • Chengxing Shen
    • 1
  • Gaojun Teng
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of CardiologyZhongda Hospital, Southeast UniversityNanjingChina
  2. 2.Jiangsu Key Lab of Molecular and Function Imaging, Department of RadiologyZhongda Hospital, Southeast UniversityNanjingChina

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