Molecular Imaging and Biology

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 427–434 | Cite as

Myocardial Perfusion Imaging is Feasible for Infarct Size Quantification in Mice Using a Clinical Single-photon Emission Computed Tomography System Equipped with Pinhole Collimators

  • Tim Wollenweber
  • Christian Zach
  • Christoph Rischpler
  • Rebekka Fischer
  • Sebastian Nowak
  • Stephan G. Nekolla
  • Michael Gröbner
  • Christopher Übleis
  • Gerald Assmann
  • Christian La Fougére
  • Guido Böning
  • Paul Cumming
  • Wolfgang-Michael Franz
  • Marcus Hacker
Research Article

Abstract

Introduction

The aim of this study is to evaluate a non-invasive method for measuring myocardial perfusion defect size in mice using a clinical single-photon emission computed tomography system equipped with pinhole collimators (pinhole SPECT).

Materials and Methods

Thirty days after ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery, 13 mice (C57BL/6J) were imaged following intravenous injection of 370 MBq [99mTc]sestamibi. Eight control mice without myocardial infarction were likewise investigated. Image quality optimization had been achieved by repeated scanning of a multiple point phantom, with varying zoom factors, number of projection angles, and pinhole diameter. Volumetric sampling was used to generate polar maps, in which intensity was normalized to that of a standard septal region of interest (ROI), which was set at 100%. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed to define an optimal threshold as compared to histologically measured defect sizes, which were considered as gold standard.

Results

A spatial resolution of 1.9 mm was achieved using a pinhole diameter of 0.5 mm, a zoom factor of 2, and 6° projection angles. Histological results were best reproduced by a 60% threshold relative to the septal reference ROI. By applying this threshold, SPECT perfusion defect sizes revealed very high correlation to the histological results (R2 = 0.867) with excellent intra- and interobserver reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.84 and 0.82).

Conclusions

We achieved a spatial resolution of 1.9 mm in myocardial perfusion imaging in mice using a clinical SPECT system mounted with pinhole collimators. Compared to a histological gold standard, the infarct sizes were accurately estimated, indicating that this method shows promise to monitor experimental cardiac interventions in mice.

Key words

Myocardial infarction Mice Pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography Perfusion Quantification 

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Copyright information

© Academy of Molecular Imaging 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tim Wollenweber
    • 1
  • Christian Zach
    • 1
  • Christoph Rischpler
    • 2
  • Rebekka Fischer
    • 2
  • Sebastian Nowak
    • 1
  • Stephan G. Nekolla
    • 3
  • Michael Gröbner
    • 2
  • Christopher Übleis
    • 1
  • Gerald Assmann
    • 4
  • Christian La Fougére
    • 1
  • Guido Böning
    • 1
  • Paul Cumming
    • 1
  • Wolfgang-Michael Franz
    • 2
  • Marcus Hacker
    • 1
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Nuclear MedicineUniversity of MunichMunichGermany
  2. 2.Medical Department I, Klinikum GrosshadernUniversity of MunichMunichGermany
  3. 3.Department of Nuclear MedicineTechnical UniversityMunichGermany
  4. 4.Institute of PathologyUniversity of MunichMunichGermany
  5. 5.Klinik und Poliklinik für Nuklearmedizin der LMUMunichGermany

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