Molecular Imaging and Biology

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 106–109 | Cite as

Assessment of Progression and Treatment Response of Optic Pathway Glioma with Positron Emission Tomography using α-[11C]Methyl-l-Tryptophan

  • Fangyu Peng
  • Csaba Juhasz
  • Kanta Bhambhani
  • Dafang Wu
  • Diane C. Chugani
  • Harry T. Chugani
Brief Article

Abstract

Purpose

To report the utility of positron emission tomography (PET) with α-[11C]methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT) for monitoring progression and response to treatment of an isolated optic pathway glioma (OPG) in a 16-year-old girl.

Procedures

Positron emission tomography scanning of the brain was performed 20 minutes after intravenous administration of AMT. The AMT-PET images were reconstructed and examined for tumor uptake of the tracer in correlation with coregistered magnetic resonance images.

Results

The PET scan demonstrated increased uptake of AMT by OPG in a clinically symptomatic child whose magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was inconclusive for morphological changes of the tumor. The tracer uptake was dramatically decreased on the images obtained after chemotherapy. Subsequently, AMT-PET revealed a new tumor lesion of increased AMT uptake when the patient developed vision problems and MRI showed no significant interval morphological changes. Significant vision improvement was observed after external beam radiotherapy for the newly identified tumor lesion.

Conclusions

Positron emission tomography with α-[11C]methyl-l-tryptophan may be useful for monitoring progression and response to treatment of OPGs, which needs to be further investigated in a prospective study of more patients, including those with neurofibromatosis.

Key words

Optical pathway glioma Positron emission tomography α-[11C]Methyl-l-tryptophan 

References

  1. 1.
    Thiagalingam S, Flaherty M, Billson F, et al. (2004) Neurofibromatosis type 1 and optic pathway gliomas. Ophthalmology 111:568–577PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Singhal S, Birch JM, Kerr B, et al. (2002) Neurofibromatosis type 1 and sporadic optic gliomas. Arch Dis Child 87:65–70PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Hoffman HJ, Humphreys RP, Drake JM, et al. (1992) Optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas: A dilemma in management. Pediatr Neurosurg 19:186–189CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Listernick R, Louis DN, Packer RJ, Gutamann DH (1997) Optic pathway gliomas in children with neurofibromatosis 1: Consensus statement from the NF1 optic pathway glioma task force. Ann Neurol 41:143–149PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Chateil JF, Soussotte C, Pedespan JM, et al. (2001) MRI and clinical differences between optic pathway tumors in children with and without neurofibromatosis. Br J Radiol 74:24–31PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Benard F, Romsa J, Hustinx R (2003) Imaging gliomas with positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography. Semin Nucl Med 33:148–162PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Juhász C, Chugani DC, Muzik O, et al. (2006) In vivo uptake and metabolism of α-[11C]methyl-l-tryptophan in human brain tumors. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 26:345–57PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Bergstroem M, Litton J, Bohm C, Blomquist G (1982) Determination of object contour from projections for attenuation correction in cranial positron emission tomography. J Comput Assist Tomogr 6:365–72CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Pietrzyk U, Herholz K, Fink G, et al. (1994) An interactive technique for three-dimensional image registration: Validation for PET, SPECT, MRI, and CT brain studies. J Nucl Med 35:2011–2018PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Muzik O, Chugani DC, Chakraborty P, et al. (1997) Analysis of [C-11]alpha-methyl-tryptophan kinetics for the estimation of serotonin synthesis rate in vivo. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 17:659–669PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Chugani DC, Muzik O, Behen M, et al. (1999) Developmental changes in brain serotonin synthesis capacity in autistic and nonautistic children. Ann Neurol 45:287–295PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Packer RJ, Lange B, Ater J, et al. (1993) Carboplatin and vincristine for recurrent and newly diagnosed low-grade gliomas of childhood. J Clin Oncol 11:850–856PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Diksic M, Nagahiro S, Sourkes TL, Yamamoto YL (1990) A new method to measure brain serotonin synthesis in vivo. I. Theory and basic data for a biological model. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 9:1–12Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Chugani DC, Muzik O (2000) Alpha [C-11] methyl-L-tryptophan PET maps brain serotonin synthesis and kynurenine pathway metabolism. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 20:2–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Academy of Molecular Imaging 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fangyu Peng
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Csaba Juhasz
    • 1
    • 4
  • Kanta Bhambhani
    • 1
    • 3
  • Dafang Wu
    • 2
    • 3
  • Diane C. Chugani
    • 1
    • 2
  • Harry T. Chugani
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.The Carman & Ann Adams Department of PediatricsWayne State University School of MedicineDetroitUSA
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyWayne State University School of MedicineDetroitUSA
  3. 3.Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer InstituteWayne State University School of MedicineDetroitUSA
  4. 4.Department of NeurologyWayne State University School of MedicineDetroitUSA

Personalised recommendations