Advertisement

Tree Genetics & Genomes

, 13:45 | Cite as

Eastern filbert blight disease resistance from Corylus americana ‘Rush’ and selection ‘Yoder #5’ maps to linkage group 7

  • G. Bhattarai
  • S. A. MehlenbacherEmail author
  • D. C. Smith
Original Article
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Disease Resistance

Abstract

Eastern filbert blight (EFB), caused by the pyrenomycete Anisogramma anomala, is a serious threat to the hazelnut industry in the Pacific Northwest. EFB is endemic in eastern North America where it occasionally produces small cankers on the wild American hazelnut (Corylus americana). In contrast, most cultivars of European hazelnut (Corylus avellana) are susceptible. Genetic resistance is the most promising disease control method and is an objective of the Oregon State University hazelnut breeding program. ‘Gasaway’ resistance, which is governed by a dominant allele at a single locus, has been extensively used in the program. However, ‘Gasaway’ and some of its offspring have been infected by EFB isolates from New Jersey, Minnesota, and Michigan. Efforts to create new cultivars with durable EFB resistance include identifying and studying new resistance sources. In this study, resistant accessions C. americana ‘Rush’ and interspecific hybrid selection ‘Yoder #5’ were crossed with susceptible C. avellana selections and the resulting segregating seedling populations were inoculated by either exposure of potted trees under a structure topped with diseased branches or field exposure supplemented by tying diseased branches to each tree. Disease response was scored when cankers were visible 20 months after inoculation. Resistance from both sources segregated in a 1:1 ratio, indicating control by a single locus and a dominant allele for resistance. DNA extracted from the seedlings was amplified with previously mapped microsatellite markers. Resistance from both C. americana ‘Rush’ and ‘Yoder #5’ was placed on linkage group 7 in the same position as resistance from C. avellana ‘Ratoli.’ Linked microsatellite markers B753, GB372, and B509 will be useful for marker-assisted selection and the pyramiding of genes for durable EFB resistance. Assessing response to EFB is challenging, whether the plants are inoculated under a structure topped with diseased wood or in a humidity chamber in the greenhouse, or by exposure in the field. The pathogen has a 2-year life cycle, and there is a 15-month wait between inoculation and symptom expression. A small number of escapes is commonly encountered, and resistant plants occasionally develop small cankers. Our approach of studying segregation ratios and then mapping with microsatellite markers should be a useful approach for disease resistance studies in many tree crops.

Keywords

Disease resistance Eastern filbert blight Hazelnut Corylus avellana  Linkage mapping 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Funding for this research was provided by the Oregon Hazelnut Commission, Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station, Hatch Act Funds, a specific cooperative agreement with USDA, USDA-NIFA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive Grant 2014-67013-22421, and USDA-NIFA Specialty Crops Research Initiative Competitive Grant 2009-51181-06028.

Supplementary material

11295_2017_1129_MOESM1_ESM.docx (107 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 106 kb)

References

  1. Bhattarai G (2015) Microsatellite marker development, characterization and mapping in European hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.), and investigation of novel sources of eastern filbert blight resistance in several Corylus species. MS Thesis, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OregonGoogle Scholar
  2. Cameron HR (1976) Eastern filbert blight established in the Pacific Northwest. Plant Dis Rep 60:737–740Google Scholar
  3. Capik JM, Molnar TJ (2012) Assessment of host (Corylus sp.) resistance to eastern filbert blight in New Jersey. J Amer Soc Hort Sci 137:157–172Google Scholar
  4. Capik JM, Muehlbauer M, Novy A, Honig JA, Molnar TJ (2013) Eastern filbert blight-resistant hazelnuts from Russia, Ukraine and Poland. HortSci 48:466–473Google Scholar
  5. Chen H, Mehlenbacher SA, Smith DC (2005) AFLP markers linked to eastern filbert blight resistance from OSU 408.040 hazelnut. J Amer Soc Hort Sci 130:412–417Google Scholar
  6. Chen H, Mehlenbacher SA, Smith DC (2007) Hazelnut accessions provide new sources of resistance to eastern filbert blight. HortSci 42:466–469Google Scholar
  7. Colburn BC, Mehlenbacher SA, Sathuvalli VR, Smith DC (2015) Eastern filbert blight resistance in hazelnut accessions ‘Culplà’,‘Crvenje’, and OSU 495.072. J Amer Soc Hort Sci 140:191–200Google Scholar
  8. Coyne CJ, Mehlenbacher SA, Smith DC (1998) Sources of resistance to eastern filbert blight in hazelnut. J Amer Soc Hort Sci 123:253–257Google Scholar
  9. David P, Chen NW, Pedrosa-Harand A, Thareau V, Sévignac M, Cannon SB, Debouck D, Langin T, Geffroy V (2009) A nomadic subtelomeric disease resistance gene cluster in common bean. Plant Physiol 151:1048–1065CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  10. Gökirmak T, Mehlenbacher SA, Bassil NV (2009) Characterization of European hazelnut (Corylus avellana) cultivars using SSR markers. Genet Resour Crop Evol 56:147–172CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Gürcan K, Mehlenbacher SA (2010) Development of microsatellite marker loci for European hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) from ISSR fragments. Mol Breed 26:551–559CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Gürcan K, Mehlenbacher SA, Botta R, Boccacci P (2010) Development, characterization, segregation, and mapping of microsatellite markers for European hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) from enriched genomic libraries and usefulness in genetic diversity studies. Tree Genetics and Genomes 6:513–531CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Johnson KB, Pinkerton JN, Gaudreault SM, Stone JK (1994) Infection of European hazelnut by Anisogramma anomala: site of infection and effect of host developmental stage. Phytopathology 84:1465–1470CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Lehmensiek A, Sutherland MW, McNamara RB (2008) The use of high resolution melting (HRM) to map single nucleotide polymorphism markers linked to a covered smut resistance gene in barley. Theor Appl Genet 117:721–728CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Lunde CF, Mehlenbacher SA, Smith DC (2000) Survey of hazelnut cultivars for response to eastern filbert blight inoculation. HortSci 35:729–731Google Scholar
  16. Lunde CF, Mehlenbacher SA, Smith DC (2006) Segregation for resistance to eastern filbert blight in progeny of ‘Zimmerman’ hazelnut. J Amer Soc Hort Sci 131:731–737Google Scholar
  17. Mehlenbacher SA, Azarenko AN, Smith DC, McCluskey R (2000) ‘Lewis’ hazelnut. HortSci 35:314–315Google Scholar
  18. Mehlenbacher SA, Azarenko AN, Smith DC, McCluskey R (2001) ‘Clark’ hazelnut. HortSci 36:995–996Google Scholar
  19. Mehlenbacher SA, Smith DC, McCluskey RL (2008) ‘Sacajawea’ hazelnut. HortSci 43:255–257Google Scholar
  20. Mehlenbacher SA, Thompson MM, Cameron HR (1991) Occurrence and inheritance of resistance to eastern filbert blight in ‘Gasaway’ hazelnut. HortSci 26:410–411Google Scholar
  21. Mehlenbacher SA, Olsen JL (1997) The hazelnut industry in Oregon. Acta Hort 445:337–345CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Mehlenbacher SA, Brown RN, Nouhra ER, Gökirmak T, Bassil NV, Kubisiak TL (2006) A genetic linkage map for hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) based on RAPD and SSR markers. Genome 49:122–133PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. Molnar TJ (2011) Corylus. In: Kole C (ed) Wild crop relatives: genomic and breeding resources. Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, Germany, pp 15–48CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Molnar TJ, Capik JM (2012) Eastern filbert blight susceptibility of American x European hazelnut progenies. HortSci 47:1412–1418Google Scholar
  25. Molnar TJ, Capik JM, Goffreda JC (2009) Response of hazelnut progenies from known resistant parents to Anisograma anomala in New Jersey, USA. Acta Hort 845:73–82CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Molnar TJ, Goffreda JC, Funk CR (2005) Developing hazelnuts for the eastern United States. Acta Hort 686:609–617CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Molnar TJ, Goffreda JC, Funk CR (2010) Survey of Corylus resistance to Anisograma anomala from different geographic locations. HortSci 45:832–836Google Scholar
  28. Molnar TJ, Zaurov DE, Goffreda JC, Mehlenbacher SA (2007) Survey of hazelnut germplasm from Russia and Crimea for response to eastern filbert blight. HortSci 42:51–56Google Scholar
  29. Muehlbauer MF, Honig JA, Capik JM, Vaiciunas JN, Molnar TJ (2014) Characterization of eastern filbert blight-resistant hazelnut germplasm using microsatellite markers. J Amer Soc Hort Sci 139:399–432Google Scholar
  30. Peterschmidt BC (2013) DNA markers and characterization of novel sources of eastern filbert blight resistance in European hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.). MS Thesis, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OregonGoogle Scholar
  31. Pinkerton JN, Johnson KB, Mehlenbacher SA, Pscheidt JW (1993) Susceptibility of European hazelnut clones to eastern filbert blight. Plant Dis 77:261–266CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Pinkerton JN, Johnson KB, Stone JK, Ivors KL (1998) Factors affecting the release of ascospores of Anisogramma anomala. Phytopathology 88:122–128CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  33. Pinkerton JN, Stone JK, Nelson SJ, Johnson KB (1995) Infection of European hazelnut by Anisogramma anomala: ascospore adhesion, mode of penetration of immature shoots, and host response. Phytopathology 85:1260–1268CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Pscheidt JW (2010) Eastern filbert blight help page. Oregon State University Extension Service. 1 Dec. 2012. http://oregonstate.edu/dept/botany/epp/EFB/
  35. Ribas AF, Cenci A, Combes MC, Etienne H, Lashermes P (2011) Organization and molecular evolution of a disease-resistance gene cluster in coffee trees. BMC Genomics 12(1):240CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  36. Rowley E (2016) Genetic resource development for European hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.). Ph.D. dissertation, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OregonGoogle Scholar
  37. Sathuvalli VR, Mehlenbacher SA (2012) Characterization of American hazelnut (Corylus americana) accessions and Corylus americana× Corylus avellana hybrids using microsatellite markers. Genet Resour Crop Evol 59:1055–1075CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Sathuvalli VR, Chen H, Mehlenbacher SA, Smith DC (2011a) DNA markers linked to eastern filbert blight resistance in ‘Ratoli’ hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) Tree Genetics and Genomes 7:337–345CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Sathuvalli VR, Mehlenbacher SA, Smith DC (2011b) DNA markers linked to eastern filbert blight resistance from a hazelnut selection from the Republic of Georgia. J Amer Soc Hort Sci 136:350–357Google Scholar
  40. Sathuvalli VR, Mehlenbacher SA, Smith DC (2012) Identification and mapping of DNA markers linked to eastern filbert blight resistance from OSU 408.040 hazelnut. HortSci 47:570–573Google Scholar
  41. Semagn K, Babu R, Hearne S, Olsen M (2014) Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping using kompetitive allele specific PCR (KASP): overview of the technology and its application in crop improvement. Mol Breeding 33:1–14CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Singh S, Sidhu JS, Huang N, Vikal Y, Li Z, Brar DS, Dhaliwal HS, Khush GS (2001) Pyramiding three bacterial blight resistance genes (xa5, xa13 and Xa21) using marker-assisted selection into indica rice cultivar PR106. Theor Appl Genet 102:1011–1015CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Stone JK, Johnson KB, Pinkerton JN, Pscheidt JW (1992) Natural infection period and susceptibility of vegetative seedlings of European hazelnut to Anisograma anomala. Plant Dis 76:348–352CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Studer B, Jensen LB, Fiil A, Torben Asp T (2009) “Blind” mapping of genic DNA sequence polymorphisms in Lolium perenne L. by high resolution melting curve analysis. Mol Breeding 24:191–199CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Suh JP, Jeung JU, Noh TH, Cho YC, Park SH, Park HS, Shin MS, Kim CK, Jena KK (2013) Development of breeding lines with three pyramided resistance genes that confer broad-spectrum bacterial blight resistance and their molecular analysis in rice. Rice 6(1):5CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  46. Ujino-Ihara T, Taguchi Y, Moriguchi Y, Tsumura Y (2010) An efficient method for developing SNP markers based on EST data combined with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis. BMC Res Notes 3:51. doi: 10.1186/1756-0500-3-51 CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  47. Xu M, Korban SS (2002) A cluster of four receptor-like genes resides in the Vf locus that confers resistance to apple scab disease. Genetics 162:1995–2006PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Bhattarai
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. A. Mehlenbacher
    • 1
    Email author
  • D. C. Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HorticultureOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
  2. 2.Department of HorticultureUniversity of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA

Personalised recommendations