World Wide Web

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 243–277

Bringing Semantics to Web Services with OWL-S

  • David Martin
  • Mark Burstein
  • Drew McDermott
  • Sheila McIlraith
  • Massimo Paolucci
  • Katia Sycara
  • Deborah L. McGuinness
  • Evren Sirin
  • Naveen Srinivasan
Open Access
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11280-007-0033-x

Cite this article as:
Martin, D., Burstein, M., McDermott, D. et al. World Wide Web (2007) 10: 243. doi:10.1007/s11280-007-0033-x

Abstract

Current industry standards for describing Web Services focus on ensuring interoperability across diverse platforms, but do not provide a good foundation for automating the use of Web Services. Representational techniques being developed for the Semantic Web can be used to augment these standards. The resulting Web Service specifications enable the development of software programs that can interpret descriptions of unfamiliar Web Services and then employ those services to satisfy user goals. OWL-S (“OWL for Services”) is a set of notations for expressing such specifications, based on the Semantic Web ontology language OWL. It consists of three interrelated parts: a profile ontology, used to describe what the service does; a process ontology and corresponding presentation syntax, used to describe how the service is used; and a grounding ontology, used to describe how to interact with the service. OWL-S can be used to automate a variety of service-related activities involving service discovery, interoperation, and composition. A large body of research on OWL-S has led to the creation of many open-source tools for developing, reasoning about, and dynamically utilizing Web Services.

Keywords

Web Services Semantic Web Semantic Web Services OWL OWL-S service discovery service composition 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Martin
    • 1
  • Mark Burstein
    • 2
  • Drew McDermott
    • 3
  • Sheila McIlraith
    • 4
  • Massimo Paolucci
    • 5
  • Katia Sycara
    • 6
  • Deborah L. McGuinness
    • 7
  • Evren Sirin
    • 8
  • Naveen Srinivasan
    • 9
  1. 1.Artificial Intelligence Center, SRI InternationalMenlo ParkUSA
  2. 2.Intelligent Distributed Computing DepartmentBBN TechnologiesCambridgeUSA
  3. 3.Computer Science DepartmentYale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  4. 4.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  5. 5.DoCoMo Communications Laboratories EuropeMunichGermany
  6. 6.Robotics InstituteCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA
  7. 7.Knowledge Systems, Artificial Intelligence LaboratoryStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  8. 8.Clark+Parsia, LLCArlingtonUSA
  9. 9.webMethods, Inc.FairfaxUSA

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