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An IoT Assisted System for Generating Emergency Alerts Using Routine Analysis

  • Prateek Pandey
  • Ratnesh LitoriyaEmail author
Article
  • 13 Downloads

Abstract

This paper proposes a system to generate intimations in emergencies using the internet of things and machine learning to work as a virtual agent. The idea is to learn the routine behavior of individuals inside their homes by analyzing the data gathered from door sensors and send alerts to the caregivers in case of emergencies. The application of the proposed work is limited to the individuals living alone in their houses. Thus, an older adult living alone in his house is a typical case where the proposed system is useful. Emergency consists of situations like falls and slips, strokes, or other incidents that make the subject inside the house fall unconscious. If any anomaly is detected in the usual routine, the caregivers are immediately informed by the system. Apart from emergency assessment, the paper also discusses the possibility of disease detection by subject routine analysis.

Keywords

Routine analysis Older adult care Virtual agent Fuzzy numbers 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and EngineeringJaypee University of Engineering and TechnologyRaghogarh, GunaIndia

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