Energy Efficient Clustering Scheme (EECS) for Wireless Sensor Network with Mobile Sink

  • V. Saranya
  • S. Shankar
  • G. R. Kanagachidambaresan
Article
  • 18 Downloads

Abstract

The participants in the Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) are highly resource constraint in nature. The clustering approach in the WSN supports a large-scale monitoring with ease to the user. The node near the sink depletes the energy, forming energy holes in the network. The mobility of the sink creates a major challenge in reliable and energy efficient data communication towards the sink. Hence, a new energy efficient routing protocol is needed to serve the use of networks with a mobile sink. The primary objective of the proposed work is to enhance the lifetime of the network and to increase the packet delivered to mobile sink in the network. The residual energy of the node, distance, and the data overhead are taken into account for selection of cluster head in this proposed Energy Efficient Clustering Scheme (EECS). The waiting time of the mobile sink is estimated. Based on the mobility model, the role of the sensor node is realized as finite state machine and the state transition is realized through Markov model. The proposed EECS algorithm is also been compared with Modified-Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy (MOD-LEACH) and Gateway-based Energy-Aware multi-hop Routing protocol algorithms (M-GEAR). The proposed EECS algorithm outperforms the MOD-LEACH algorithm by 1.78 times in terms of lifetime and 1.103 times in terms of throughput. The EECS algorithm promotes unequal clustering by avoiding the energy hole and the HOT SPOT issues.

Keywords

Energy efficient Clustering Energy hole HOT SPOT Markov model 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Information TechnologySri Krishna College of Engineering and TechnologyCoimbatoreIndia
  2. 2.Department of CSEHindusthan College of Engineering and TechnologyCoimbatoreIndia
  3. 3.Department of CSEVel Tech Rangarajan Dr. Sagunthala R&D Institute of Science and TechnologyAvadi, ChennaiIndia

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