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Wireless Networks

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 525–539 | Cite as

ASR: anonymous and secure reporting of traffic forwarding activity in mobile ad hoc networks

  • Heesook Choi
  • William Enck
  • Jaesheung Shin
  • Patrick D. McDaniel
  • Thomas F. La Porta
Article

Abstract

Nodes forward data on behalf of each other in mobile ad hoc networks. In a civilian application, nodes are assumed to be selfish and rational, i.e., they pursue their own self-interest. Hence, the ability to accurately measure traffic forwarding is critical to ensure proper network operation. These measurements are also often used to credit nodes based on their level of participation, or to detect loss. Past solutions employ neighbor monitoring and reporting on traffic forwarding of nodes. These methods are not applicable in civilian networks in which neighbor nodes lack the desire or ability to perform the monitoring function. Such environments occur frequently in which neighbor hosts are resource constrained, or in networks where directional antennas are used and reliable eavesdropping is difficult or impossible. In this article, we propose a protocol that uses nodes on the data path to securely produce packet-forwarding reports. Reporting nodes are chosen randomly and secretly so that malicious nodes cannot modify their behavior based upon the monitoring point. The integrity and authenticity of reports are preserved through the use of secure link layer acknowledgments and monitoring reports. The robustness of the reporting mechanism is strengthened by forwarding the report to multiple destinations (source and destination). We explore the security, cost, and accuracy of our protocol.

Keywords

MANET Security Anonymity Packet forwarding Monitoring Secure link layer acknowledgment Secure reporting protocol 

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Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by NSF Grant NSF CNS-0519460. Research was sponsored in part by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the U.K. Ministry of Defence and was accomplished under Agreement Number W911NF-06-3-0001. The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the author(s) and should not be interpreted as representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, the U.S. Government, the U.K. Ministry of Defence or the U.K. Government. The U.S. and U.K. Governments are authorized to reproduce and distribute reprints for Government purposes notwithstanding any copyright notation heron.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heesook Choi
    • 1
    • 2
  • William Enck
    • 1
  • Jaesheung Shin
    • 1
  • Patrick D. McDaniel
    • 1
  • Thomas F. La Porta
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and EngineeringThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  2. 2.Sprint Nextel Applied Research & Advanced Technology Labs (AR & ATL)1 Adrian CourtBurligameUSA

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