World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 24, Issue 9, pp 1955–1959 | Cite as

Antifungal properties of selected plants from the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico

  • M. Marcela Gamboa-Angulo
  • Jairo Cristóbal-Alejo
  • Irma L. Medina-Baizabal
  • Fátima Chí-Romero
  • Ramiro Méndez-González
  • Paulino Simá-Polanco
  • Filogonio May-Pat
Original Paper

Abstract

A total of 20 plants belonging to different genera (Acalypha, Ageratum, Ambrosia, Bidens, Blechum, Caesalpinia, Calea, Carlowrightia, Croton, Eugenia (2), Furcraea, Stenandrium, Tephrosia, Trichilia (2), Randia (3), and Vitex) were selected from native flora of the Yucatan peninsula. All plants selected were collected and separated in to leaves, stems and roots. These were then extracted with ethanol and their crude extracts (54) were evaluated against Alternaria tagetica, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizopus sp. using the filter paper disc diffusion assay. Results lead to the selection of 33 crude extracts active against at least one of the target strains, which were assessed to determine their ability to inhibit the mycelial growth of the pathogenic fungi in a second antifungal assay. The results of this assay indicated that extracts from the roots of Croton chichenensis were the most promising, with a wide activity spectrum against all pathogens tested in both assays with inhibition percentages of greater than 60%. Furthermore, extracts from leaves of Ambrosia hispida, Trichilia minutiflora, and roots of Acalypha gaumeri were able to cause growth inhibition against two or three pathogen strains (≥50%). Studies of these active extracts should be continued at different levels. In general, results revealed a good bioactive potential of the flora from the Yucatan peninsula to produce metabolites with potential applications as botanical pesticides in the near future.

Keywords

Acalypha Antifungal Croton Fungi Native plants Phytopathogens The Yucatan peninsula 

References

  1. Abo KA, Ogunleye VO, Ashidi JS (1999) Antimicrobial potential of Spondias mombin, Croton zambesicus and Zygotritonia crocea. Phytother Res 13:494–497CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Abou-Jawdah Y, Sobh H, Salameh A (2002) Antimycotic activities of selected plant flora, growing wild in Lebanon, against phytopathogenic fungi. J Agric Food Chem 50:3208–3213CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Adesina SK, Idowu O, Ogundaini AO, Oladimeji H, Olugbade TA, Onawunmi GO, Pais M (2000) Antimicrobial constituents of the leaves of Acalypha wilkesiana and Acalypha híspida. Phytother Res 14:371–374CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Aguilar-Guadarrama AB, Rios MY (2004) Tree new sesquiterpenes from Croton arboreous. J Nat Prod 67:914–917CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Cristóbal-Alejo J, Tun-Suarez JM, Moguel-Catzin S, Marbán-Medoza N, Medina-Baizabal L, Simá-Polanco P, Peraza-Sánchez S, Gamboa-Angulo MM (2006) In vitro sensitivity of Meloidogyne incorgnita to extracts from native Yucatecan plants. Nematropica 36:89–97Google Scholar
  6. Durán R, Campos G (2000) Listado florístico de la Península de Yucatán. Centro Investigación Científica de Yucatán AC Impresiones Profesionales del Sureste, S.A de C.V., Mérida Yucatán, México pp 9, 11, 53, 55, 93, 153, 168, 173. ISBN: 9686532099Google Scholar
  7. Freixa B, Vila R, Vargas L, Lozano N, Adzet T, Caniguea LS (1998) Screening for antifungal activity of nineteen Latin American plants. Phytother Res 12:427–430CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Grainge M, Ahmed S (1988) Handbook of plants with pest-control properties. Wiley, New York, pp 470. ISBN: 0471632570Google Scholar
  9. Grayer JR, Harbone JB (1994) A Survey of antifungal compounds from higher plants 1982–1993. Phytochemistry 37:19–42CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Jones K (2003) Review of sangre de drago (Croton lechleri)––a South American tree sap in the treatment of diarrhea, inflammation, insect bites, viral infections, and wounds: traditional uses to clinical research. J Altern Complem Med 9:877–896CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Kim JC, Choi GJ, Lee HB, Lee SW, Kim JS, Chung KY, Kwang YC (2004) Screening extracts of Achyranthes japonica and Rumex crispus for activity against various plant pathogenic fungi and control of powdery mildew. Pest Manag Sci 60:803–808CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Martinez Gordillo M (1996) El género Croton (Euphorbiaceae) en Mesoamérica. Tesis de maestría, Facultad de Ciencias (Biología)––UNAM, México DFGoogle Scholar
  13. Martins AP, Salgueiro LR, Goncalves MJ, Vila R, Tomi F, Adzet T, Proenca da Cunha A, Cañigueral S, Casanova J (2000) Antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of the bark oil of Croton stellulifer, an endemic species from S. Tome e Príncipe. Planta Med 66:647–650CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Milanowski DJ, Winter REK, Elvin-Lewis MPF, Lewis WH (2002) Geographic distribution of tree alkaloid chemotypes of Croton lechleri. J Nat Prod 65:814–819CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. NAPRALERT Database, College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago ILGoogle Scholar
  16. Oyelami OA, Onayemi O, Oladimeji FA, Ogundaini AO, Olugbade TA, Onawunmi GO (2003) Clinical evaluation of Acalypha ointment in the treatment of superficial fungal skin diseases. Phytother Res 17:555–557CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Palmeira SF Jr, Conserva LM, Barbosa Filho JM (2006) Clerodane diterpenes from Croton species: distribution and compilation on their 13C NMR spectral data. Nat Prod Commun 1:319–344Google Scholar
  18. Quiroga EN, Samprieto AR, Vattuone MA (2004) In vitro fungitoxic activity of Larrea divaricata cav. extracts. Lett Appl Microbiol 39:7–12CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Rotem J (1994) The genus Alternaria. Biology, epidemiology and pathogenicity. APS Press, St. Paul, pp 77, 95–100. ISBN: 0890541523Google Scholar
  20. Souza MAA, Souza SR, Veiga VF Jr, Cortez JKPC, Leal RS, Dantas TNC, Maciel MAM (2006) Chemical composition of the fixed oil of Croton cajucara an its antifungal properties. Rev Bras Farm 16:599–610Google Scholar
  21. Steel RDG, Torrie JH (1988) Bioestadística. Principios y procedimientos, Segunda edición. McGraw-Hill. ed., Mexico D.F., pp 662. ISBN: 9684514956Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Marcela Gamboa-Angulo
    • 1
  • Jairo Cristóbal-Alejo
    • 2
  • Irma L. Medina-Baizabal
    • 1
  • Fátima Chí-Romero
    • 1
  • Ramiro Méndez-González
    • 2
  • Paulino Simá-Polanco
    • 1
  • Filogonio May-Pat
    • 1
  1. 1.Unidad de BiotecnologíaCentro de Investigación Científica de YucatánMeridaMexico
  2. 2.Instituto Tecnológico de ConkalConkalMexico

Personalised recommendations