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Endophytic fungi from a pharmaceutical plant, Camptotheca acuminata: isolation, identification and bioactivity

  • Xiang Lin
  • Chunhua Lu
  • Yaojian HuangEmail author
  • Zhonghui Zheng
  • Wenjin Su
  • Yemao Shen
Short Communication

Abstract

About 174 endophytic fungi were isolated from the pharmaceutical plant, Camptotheca acuminata. Of the 18 taxa obtained, non-sporulating fungi (48.9%), Alternaria (12.6%), Phomopsis (6.9%), Sporidesmium (6.3%), Paecilomyces (4.6%) and Fusarium (4.6%) were dominant. ITS rDNA assay indicated that most of the non-sporulating fungi belonged to the Pyrenomycetes and Loculoascomycetes ascomycetes or their anamorph Coelomycetes.

The results of the bioactivity test showed that 27.6% of the endophytic fungi displayed inhibition against more than one indicator microorganism. 4.0% and 2.3% of the endophytic fungi showed cytotoxicity and protease inhibition, respectively. The endophytic fungi with bioactivities were distributed in more than 12 taxa including non-sporulating fungi, which are reliable sources for bioactive agents.

Keywords

Endophytic fungi Identification Bioactivity  Camptotheca acuminata 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are grateful for the support of National Natural Sciences Foundation of China (30500632).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiang Lin
    • 1
  • Chunhua Lu
    • 1
  • Yaojian Huang
    • 1
    Email author
  • Zhonghui Zheng
    • 1
  • Wenjin Su
    • 1
  • Yemao Shen
    • 1
  1. 1.The Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education of Cell Biology and Tumor Engineering, School of Life ScienceXiamen UniversityXiamenP.R. China

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