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Isolation of Bacteria Able to Metabolize High Concentrations of Formaldehyde

  • Saeed Mirdamadi
  • Afsaneh Rajabi
  • Pooneh Khalilzadeh
  • Dariush Norozian
  • Azim Akbarzadeh
  • Farzaneh Aziz Mohseni
Article

Summary

Nineteen bacterial strains able to degrade and metabolize formaldehyde as a sole carbon source were isolated from soil and wastewater of a formaldehyde production factory. The samples were cultured in complex and mineral salts media containing 370 mg formaldehyde/l. The bacterial strains were identified to be Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, P. aeruginosa, P. testosteroni, P. putida, and Methylobacterium extorquens. After adaptation of these microorganisms to high concentrations of formaldehyde; two isolated strains of M. extorquens (strains ESS and PSS) and four strains of P. pseudoalcaligenes (strains LSW, SSW, NSW and OSS) degraded 1850 mg formaldehyde/l, where as P. pseudoalcaligenes strain OSS completely consumed 3700 mg of formaldehyde/l after 24 h and degraded 70% of 5920 mg of formaldehyde/l after 72 h.

Keywords

Degradation formaldehyde isolation microorganisms 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Saeed Mirdamadi
    • 1
  • Afsaneh Rajabi
    • 2
  • Pooneh Khalilzadeh
    • 2
  • Dariush Norozian
    • 1
  • Azim Akbarzadeh
    • 1
  • Farzaneh Aziz Mohseni
    • 2
  1. 1.Pilot Biotechnology DepartmentPasteur Institute of IranTehranIran
  2. 2.Iranian Research Organization for Science & Technology (IROST)Iran

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