Evaluation of Activated Carbon-Coated Electrode in Electrostatic Precipitator and Its Regeneration for Volatile Organic Compounds Removal

  • Tae Hwan Jun
  • Min Ji Kim
  • Sungyoun Kim
  • Young Hwa Jung
  • Hak-Ryong Moon
  • Kwang-Soo Kim
Article

Abstract

Activated carbon-coated electrode was developed and applied in electrostatic precipitator to remove volatile organic compound gases simultaneously with dust particles from a contaminated air. The activated carbon coating mixture was made up of powdered activated carbon (AC), carbon black (CB), and polyvinyl acetate (PVA), and methanol was added as a solvent to control the thickness of the mixture for best coating performance. During the coating process, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface decreased to 86% of the original AC while pore volume percentages of macro pore increased, compared to micro- and meso-sized pores. The adsorption isotherm of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene (BTEX) gases onto the original AC and AC coating mixture (AC thoroughly mixed with PVA and methanol for coating and powdered again after dry) were tested and compared to each other, and it was found that both isotherm were best fitted to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm with the order of adsorption capacities; ethyl benzene > m-xylene > toluene > benzene. The difference between adsorption capacities was clearer with the absorbent AC but became little with the AC coating mixture. In removing BTEX at increasing linear velocities up to 6.7 cm/s, it appeared that the surface area of AC electrode was directly proportional to its removal rate of BTEX. The thermal desorption was applied to regenerate the AC electrode, and 200 °C was found to be most efficient for benzene desorption, but higher temperature would be required for entire BTEX gases desorption.

Keywords

Activated carbon electrode Adsorption order Isothermal adsorption Thermal desorption Volatile organic compounds 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Korea Ministry of Environment (MOE) as “Advanced Technology Program for Environmental Industry,” under grant 2016000110002.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tae Hwan Jun
    • 1
  • Min Ji Kim
    • 1
  • Sungyoun Kim
    • 2
  • Young Hwa Jung
    • 3
  • Hak-Ryong Moon
    • 2
  • Kwang-Soo Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Construction Environment EngineeringUniversity of Science and Technology Korea (UST)DaejeonRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building TechnologyGoyang-siRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.DaeguRepublic of Korea

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