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Water, Air, & Soil Pollution

, 226:411 | Cite as

Ecotoxicological Effects of an Arsenic Remediation Method on Three Freshwater Organisms—Lemna disperma, Chlorella sp. CE-35 and Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia

  • M. Azizur RahmanEmail author
  • Ben Hogan
  • Elliott Duncan
  • Christopher Doyle
  • Mohammad Mahmudur Rahman
  • T. V. Nguyen
  • Richard P. Lim
  • William Maher
  • Ravi Naidu
  • Rick Krassoi
  • S. Vigneswaran
  • Christel Hassler
Article
  • 252 Downloads

Abstract

Chemical methods have been used for the remediation of arsenic (As)-contaminated water; however, ecological consequences of these methods have not been properly addressed. The present study evaluated the effects of the Fe-oxide-coated sand (IOCS) remediation method on As toxicity to freshwater organisms (Lemna disperma, Chlorella sp. CE-35, and Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia). The As removal efficiency by IOCS decreased substantially with time. The IOCS remediation method was less effective at suppressing the toxicity of AsV than AsIII to L. disperma but was highly effective in reducing both the AsIII and AsV toxicity to C. cf. dubia. The growth of Chlorella sp. was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in remediated and pre-remediated water than in controls (non-As-contaminated filtered Colo River water) for AsIII, while the opposite was observed for AsV, indicating that AsV is more toxic than AsIII to this microalga. Although the IOCS can efficiently remove As from contaminated water, residual As and other constituents (e.g. Fe, nitrate) in the remediated water had a significant effect on freshwater organisms.

Keywords

Arsenic Fe-oxide-coated sand (IOCS) Remediation Ecotoxicological effect Freshwater organisms 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by University of Technology Sydney (UTS) through Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research fellowships to Dr. M. A. Rahman and Dr. C. Hassler. We acknowledge financial support from the Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC-CARE project 3.1.3.11/12), Australia. Financial support also provided by the Ecochemistry laboratory, University of Canberra, Australia. We would like to thank Dr. Anne Colville at UTS for technical support in the conduct of the experiments, Ms. Merrin Adams and Ms. Monique Binet of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia for providing the freshwater phytoplankton, and the Ecotox Services Australasia Pty Ltd. for providing the cladocerans.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Azizur Rahman
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ben Hogan
    • 1
  • Elliott Duncan
    • 2
  • Christopher Doyle
    • 3
  • Mohammad Mahmudur Rahman
    • 4
    • 5
  • T. V. Nguyen
    • 6
  • Richard P. Lim
    • 1
  • William Maher
    • 2
  • Ravi Naidu
    • 4
    • 5
  • Rick Krassoi
    • 3
  • S. Vigneswaran
    • 6
  • Christel Hassler
    • 1
    • 7
  1. 1.Centre for Environmental Sustainability, School of the EnvironmentUniversity of Technology SydneyUltimoAustralia
  2. 2.Ecochemistry Laboratory, Institute for Applied EcologyUniversity of CanberraCanberraAustralia
  3. 3.Ecotox Services Australasia Pty. Ltd.Lane CoveAustralia
  4. 4.Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER), Faculty of Science & Information TechnologyUniversity of NewcastleUniversity DriveAustralia
  5. 5.Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC-CARE)CallaghanAustralia
  6. 6.Faculty of Engineering and ITUniversity of Technology SydneySydneyAustralia
  7. 7.Institute F. A. ForelUniversity of GenevaGenevaSwitzerland

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