Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

, Volume 173, Issue 1–4, pp 273–287

Evidence of Elevated Ozone Concentrations on Forested Slopes of the Lower Fraser Valley, British Columbia, Canada

  • Judi Krzyzanowski
  • Ian G. McKendry
  • John L. Innes
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11270-005-9072-z

Cite this article as:
Krzyzanowski, J., McKendry, I.G. & Innes, J.L. Water Air Soil Pollut (2006) 173: 273. doi:10.1007/s11270-005-9072-z

Abstract

During the summers of 2001 and 2002, hourly average ozone concentrations were measured at three sites of differing elevation (188, 588, and 1221 m.a.s.l.) on the forested south-facing slopes of the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV), British Columbia. Sites experienced ozone concentrations ranging from 0 to 88 ppb in 2001, and 0 to 96 ppb in 2002. Daily patterns were in agreement with previous studies showing morning increases and late afternoon peaks. Reduced diurnal variation increased the exposure of higher-elevation forested sites. An upper-level ridge coinciding with a thermal coastal trough caused above-average ozone concentrations, and the ‘maximum acceptable’ 1-hour National Ambient Air Quality Objective (AQO) of 82 ppb to be exceeded. Maximum ozone concentrations and AQO exceedance frequency both increased with distance eastward in the valley. A preliminary survey of ozone-like injury symptoms on native shrubs suggested that the elevated ozone levels occurring in the LFV may cause injury to forest plants.

Keywords

air quality objectives elevation gradient forest impacts Tropospheric ozone Vancouver 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judi Krzyzanowski
    • 1
  • Ian G. McKendry
    • 2
  • John L. Innes
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Forest Resources ManagementThe University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.Department of GeographyThe University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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