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Water, Air, & Soil Pollution: Focus

, Volume 7, Issue 1–3, pp 131–136 | Cite as

Effects of Nitrogen Supply on the Sensitivity to O3 of Growth and Photosynthesis of Japanese Beech (Fagus crenata) Seedlings

  • Masahiro Yamaguchi
  • Makoto Watanabe
  • Naoki Matsuo
  • Junichi Naba
  • Ryo Funada
  • Motohiro Fukami
  • Hideyuki Matsumura
  • Yoshihisa Kohno
  • Takeshi IzutaEmail author
Article

Abstract

To obtain basic information for evaluating critical levels of O3 under different nitrogen loads for protecting Japanese beech forests, two-year-old seedlings of Fagus crenata Blume were grown in potted andisol supplied with N as NH4NO3 solution at 0, 20 or 50 kg ha−1 year−1 and exposed to charcoal-filtered air or O3 at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 times the ambient concentration from 16 April to 22 September 2004. The O3 induced significant reductions in the whole-plant dry mass, net photosynthetic rate at 380 μmol mol−1 CO2 (A 380), carboxylation efficiency (CE) and concentrations of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and total soluble protein (TSP) in the leaves. The concentrations of Rubisco and TSP were negatively correlated with the concentration of leaf acidic amino acid, suggesting that O3 enhanced the degradation of protein such as Rubisco. The N supply to the soil did not significantly change the whole-plant dry mass and A 380, whereas it significantly increased the CE and concentrations of Rubisco and total amino acid. No significant interactive effects of O3 and N supply to the soil were detected on the growth, photosynthetic parameters and concentrations of protein and amino acid in the leaves. In conclusion, N supply to the soil at ≤50 kg ha−1 year−1 does not significantly change the sensitivity to O3 of growth and net photosynthesis of Fagus crenata seedlings.

Keywords

amino acid Fagus crenata growth nitrogen ozone photosynthesis Rubisco 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was funded by a grant from Ministry of the Environment, Japan (Global Environment Research Fund). The authors are greatly indebted to Prof. Hisao Itabashi and Prof. Keiji Hasumi of Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology for their invaluable advice on the analysis of amino acid.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masahiro Yamaguchi
    • 1
  • Makoto Watanabe
    • 1
  • Naoki Matsuo
    • 2
  • Junichi Naba
    • 2
  • Ryo Funada
    • 3
  • Motohiro Fukami
    • 4
  • Hideyuki Matsumura
    • 5
  • Yoshihisa Kohno
    • 5
  • Takeshi Izuta
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.United Graduate School of Agricultural ScienceTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyFuchu, TokyoJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of AgricultureTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyFuchu, TokyoJapan
  3. 3.Institute of Symbiotic Science and TechnologyTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyFuchu, TokyoJapan
  4. 4.Faculty of AgricultureUtsunomiya UniversityUtsunomiya, TochigiJapan
  5. 5.Central Research Institute of Electric Power IndustryAbiko, ChibaJapan

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