Water, Air, & Soil Pollution: Focus

, Volume 7, Issue 1–3, pp 249–258 | Cite as

UN/ECE ICP Materials Dose-response Functions for the Multi-pollutant Situation

  • Vladimir Kucera
  • Johan Tidblad
  • Katerina Kreislova
  • Dagmar Knotkova
  • Markus Faller
  • Daniel Reiss
  • Rolf Snethlage
  • Tim Yates
  • Jan Henriksen
  • Manfred Schreiner
  • Michael Melcher
  • Martin Ferm
  • Roger-Alexandre Lefèvre
  • Joanna Kobus
Article

Abstract

A “multi-pollutant exposure programme” reflecting the new pollution situation where SO2 is no longer the dominating pollutant has been performed by the International Co-operative Programme on Effects on Materials, including Historic and Cultural Monuments (ICP Materials) within the activities of the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution. The main results obtained in the period 1997–2003 are summarised. Dose-response functions are presented for carbon steel, zinc, copper, bronze and limestone. Parameters involved in the functions include besides SO2 and pH, which were included in the previously developed functions from ICP Materials, also the effect of particulate matter and HNO3.

Keywords

air pollution corrosion materials dose-response functions HNO3 particulate matter 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vladimir Kucera
    • 1
  • Johan Tidblad
    • 1
  • Katerina Kreislova
    • 2
  • Dagmar Knotkova
    • 2
  • Markus Faller
    • 3
  • Daniel Reiss
    • 3
  • Rolf Snethlage
    • 4
  • Tim Yates
    • 5
  • Jan Henriksen
    • 6
  • Manfred Schreiner
    • 7
  • Michael Melcher
    • 7
  • Martin Ferm
    • 8
  • Roger-Alexandre Lefèvre
    • 9
  • Joanna Kobus
    • 10
  1. 1.Corrosion and Metals Research InstituteStockholmSweden
  2. 2.SVUOM Ltd.PragueCzech Republic
  3. 3.EMPA – Corrosion and Materials IntegrityDübendorfSwitzerland
  4. 4.Bavarian State Department for Historical MonumentsMunichGermany
  5. 5.Building Research Establishment Ltd. (BRE)WatfordUnited Kingdom
  6. 6.Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU)KjellerNorway
  7. 7.Academy of Fine ArtsViennaAustria
  8. 8.Swedish Environmental Research Institute Ltd. (IVL)GothenburgSweden
  9. 9.LISA – Université Paris XIIParisFrance
  10. 10.Institute of Precision MechanicsWarsawPoland

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