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Virus Genes

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The interferon antagonistic activities of the V proteins of NDV correlated with their virulence

  • Xinglong WangEmail author
  • Ruiyi Dang
  • Zengqi YangEmail author
Article
  • 25 Downloads

Abstract

Protein V of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) serves as interferon (IFN) antagonist, and NDV stains with different pathogenicity show different abilities in inhibition IFN expression. To further reveal the relationship between viral virulence and their IFN-antagonistic activity derived from protein V, six NDV strains with three different pathotypes were used in this study and their V gene were cloned into eukaryotic expression vector. The V gene derived from different NDV strains were expressed in same level in cells after transfection according to the results from Western blotting. And these proteins showed different interferon-antagonistic activities based on interferon expression using Luciferase Reporter Assay and ELISA. The expression of IFN and viral virulence index, mean death time, have a good linear relationship indicating a good correlation between viral virulence and IFN antagonism of their V Protein.

Keywords

Newcastle disease virus (NDV) Non-structural protein Protein V Antagonistic interferon Virulence 

Abbreviations

IFN

Interferon

NDV

Newcastle disease virus

ND

Newcastle disease

SV

Sendai virus

SV5

Simian virus 5

CDV

Canine distemper virus

RPV

Rinderpest virus

RSV

Respiratory syncytial virus

NP

Nucleocapsid protein

P

Phosphoprotein

M

Matrix protein

F

Fusion protein

HN

Hemagglutinin–neuraminidase protein

L

RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

CTD

C-terminal domain

R

Arginine

E

Glutamic acid

I

Isoleucine

P

Proline

A

Alanine

IFN

Interferon

STAT1

Signal transducer and activator of transcription

MDA-5

Melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Dr Shengli Chen and Huafang Hao for providing us with the plasmids harboring V genes.

Author contributions

XW performed the experiments and made analysis of the data. RD and ZY participated preparation including discussion and editing.

Funding

This work was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 31672581).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare they have no conflict of interests.

Informed consent

All the authors consent to publish.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Veterinary MedicineNorthwest A&F UniversityYanglingPeople’s Republic of China

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