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Preparation and evaluation of danofloxacin mesylate microspheres and its pharmacokinetics in pigs

  • Chunmei Wang
  • Diyun Ai
  • Cuilan Chen
  • Heng Lin
  • Jing Li
  • Hongchun Shen
  • Weixue Yi
  • Yuanhua Qi
  • Haigang Wu
  • Jiyue CaoEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Danofloxacin mesylate gelatin microspheres (DFM-GMS) were prepared by an emulsion chemical crosslinking technique. Distribution of particle size, morphologic characteristics, drug content, and drug stability were evaluated. In-vitro study showed that the release of danofloxacin mesylate (DFM) from microspheres was much slower than from the raw material (DFM) in the release medium. Pharmacokinetic characteristics were evaluated following intramuscular injection of DFM-GMS or DFM in pigs at dosage of 2.5 mg/kg body weight. Elimination half-life (t1/2β) of the drug was 24.32 h for DFM-GMS, and 6.61 h for DFM (P < 0.01). Overall, DFM-GMS could be applied as a long-acting and lung targeting dosage form of DFM for clinical application.

Keywords

Danofloxacin mesylate microspheres Preparation-In vitro release Lung-targeting Pharmacokinetics 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors thank the Exquisite Farm of the Agricultural Ministry Key Laboratory of Pig Breeding and Genetics, for providing the Landrace pigs.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chunmei Wang
    • 1
  • Diyun Ai
    • 2
  • Cuilan Chen
    • 1
  • Heng Lin
    • 1
  • Jing Li
    • 1
  • Hongchun Shen
    • 1
  • Weixue Yi
    • 1
  • Yuanhua Qi
    • 1
  • Haigang Wu
    • 1
  • Jiyue Cao
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Laboratory of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Veterinary MedicineHuazhong Agricultural UniversityWuhanPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Institute of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Hubei Academy of Agricultural SciencesWuhanPeople’s Republic of China

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