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Veterinary Research Communications

, Volume 29, Supplement 2, pp 35–38 | Cite as

Dog Nutrient Requirements: New Knowledge

  • P. P. MussaEmail author
  • L. Prola
Article

Keywords

dog energy calculation energy evaluation energy requirements nutrient requirements 

Abbreviation

BW

body weight

DE

digestible energy

GE

gross energy

ME

metabolizable energy

Nfe

nitrogen-free extracts

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Animal ProductionEpidemiology and Ecology, Section of NutritionGrugliasco (TO)Italy

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