Plant Ecology

, Volume 215, Issue 4, pp 467–478

The effects of habitat and competitive/facilitative interactions on reintroduction success of the endangered wetland herb, Arenaria paludicola

  • Megan Bontrager
  • Kelsey Webster
  • Mark Elvin
  • Ingrid M. Parker
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11258-014-0317-z

Cite this article as:
Bontrager, M., Webster, K., Elvin, M. et al. Plant Ecol (2014) 215: 467. doi:10.1007/s11258-014-0317-z

Abstract

Establishing new populations is essential for preventing the extinction of critically endangered plant species. However, defining the range of environmental conditions suitable for the most severely endangered species is challenging, since few wild populations remain for study. Experimental reintroductions of these species can achieve multiple conservation goals by improving our understanding of habitat and management requirements while simultaneously establishing new populations. We demonstrate this with Arenaria paludicola, a critically endangered wetland plant species now known from a single wild population in coastal California. Before transplanting, we tested salinity tolerance in the greenhouse, and found tolerance of a broader range of soils than expected based on the current distribution. We then transplanted A. paludicola in three different habitat types, with and without neighbor removal. Success of A. paludicola transplants differed dramatically between the three habitat types, indicating the importance of variation at the habitat and microhabitat level. The best practices for transplant management are context-dependent: neighbor removal may promote the growth of A. paludicola, but neighbors may also facilitate transplant establishment in unstable substrates. After one year, A. paludicola continued to thrive in habitats dominated by Oenanthe sarmentosa with open canopies and moist soil. This habitat differs from that of the remaining wild population. Our discovery of an additional habitat type suitable for A. paludicola will allow more effective selection of future transplant sites.

Keywords

Indicator species Endangered species Marsh sandwort Experimental transplant Competition Facilitation 

Supplementary material

11258_2014_317_MOESM1_ESM.doc (26 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 25 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht (outside the USA) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Megan Bontrager
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kelsey Webster
    • 1
  • Mark Elvin
    • 3
  • Ingrid M. Parker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of California Santa CruzSanta CruzUSA
  2. 2.Department of BotanyUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  3. 3.U.S. Fish and Wildlife ServiceVenturaUSA

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