International Urology and Nephrology

, Volume 46, Issue 4, pp 703–710 | Cite as

The prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms in a Chinese population, and the correlation with uroflowmetry and disease perception

  • Chi-hang Yee
  • Joseph K. M. Li
  • Hon-chung Lam
  • Eddie S. Y. Chan
  • Simon See-ming Hou
  • Chi-fai Ng
Urology - Original Paper

Abstract

Objectives

To evaluate the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in a population of Chinese men, and its correlation with uroflowmetry and disease perception.

Materials and methods

Male volunteers above 40-year old were recruited in the community. Assessment with International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS), uroflowmetry, and a quiz on prostatic disease knowledge with 12 true–false-type questions were performed. Correlation of IPSS with uroflowmetry results and prostatic disease knowledge was analyzed.

Results

A total of 319 men were recruited for the study, with a mean age of 62 ± 8 years. About 69.3 % of them had moderate-to-severe symptoms on IPSS. A statistically significant correlation was found between IPSS and Q max (r = −0.260, p < 0.001), IPSS and quality of life (r = −0.172, p = 0.002), and IPSS and post-void residuals (r = 0.223, p < 0.001). About 53.0 % of subjects had less than 4 correct answers for the 12 true–false questions. Negative correlation was noted between the number of correct answers and IPSS (r = −0.185, p = 0001). In other words, for the better knowledge on prostatic diseases, the lower IPSS was found.

Conclusions

In a cohort of community-dwelling Chinese men, a significant portion of the population had moderate-to-severe LUTS. While uroflowmetry parameters were found to correlate with IPSS, the degree of knowledge on prostatic diseases also shared a statistically significant correlation with IPSS. This has an implication on the role of urological health education in the future.

Keywords

Lower urinary tract symptoms Uroflowmetry Disease perception 

Notes

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chi-hang Yee
    • 1
  • Joseph K. M. Li
    • 1
  • Hon-chung Lam
    • 1
  • Eddie S. Y. Chan
    • 1
  • Simon See-ming Hou
    • 1
  • Chi-fai Ng
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Prince of Wales HospitalChinese University of Hong KongShatinHong Kong

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