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International Urology and Nephrology

, Volume 40, Issue 2, pp 259–261 | Cite as

Treatment of immobilization hypercalciuria using weekly alendronate in two quadriplegic patients

Original Article
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Abstract

Metabolic and urinary problems encountered in spinal cord injury patients are multifaced. We report two patients with high-level spinal cord injuries who have developed hypercalciuria after admission to the rehabilitation unit. To establish a clean intermittent self-catheterization programme, the hypercalciuria was treated successfully with alendronate. Twenty-four-hour urinary calcium excretion decreased significantly after medical treatment for hypercalciuria. Since high-level quadriplegic patients may not be mobilized in the acute phase of the rehabilitation, use of alendronate for preventing hypercalciuria and maintaining a successful clean intermittent self-catheterization programme can be considered as a supportive/complementary measure.

Keywords

Alendronate Hypercalciuria Clean intermittent self-catheterization Spinal cord injury Quadriplegia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Faculty of MedicineBaskent UniversityBahcelievler, AnkaraTurkey

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