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The first identification of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) in sheep and goats in Egypt: molecular and pathological characterization

  • Amir H. Abd-Elrahman
  • Asmaa F. KhafagaEmail author
  • Osama M. Abas
Regular Articles

Abstract

Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) is one of the most fatal and contagious diseases of goats. To date, the occurrence of CCPP in Egypt has not been reported. During the period from 2017 to 2018, 200 goats and 400 sheep from Matrouh Governorate (Al Alamein and El Hammam cities) were suspected to have CCPP; animals were examined to confirm the presence of CCPP infection as well as the epidemiological status, clinical features, and molecular and histopathologic characteristics of lung tissues. Additionally, a treatment trial was performed to assess the efficacy of anti-mycoplasma therapy in the treatment of clinical cases of this disease. The occurrence of CCPP was 32.5% and 5% in goats and sheep, respectively, while case fatality was 30% and 8% in goats and sheep, respectively. The clinical forms of CCPP in both sheep and goats varied from per-acute to acute or chronic cases. Histopathological analysis of lung tissues from dead cases (either sheep or goats) revealed different stages of broncho- and pleuropneumonia ranging from per-acute to acute or chronic stages. Lung tissues showed severe congestion of interalveolar capillaries, flooding of alveoli and bronchi with a fibrinous exudate, a high degree of pleural thickening, and multifocal areas of necrosis that were sometimes sequestered in the fibrous capsule. Isolation of Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae (Mccp) was confirmed in all dead cases by agar and broth culture methods and polymerase chain reaction. The treatment trial revealed that the marbofloxacin and spiramycin groups had a higher cure rate (70%) than the oxytetracycline group (40%) and a lower fatality rate (30%) than the oxytetracycline group (60%). Conclusively, infection with CCPP in goats and sheep is considered to be novel for Mccp in Egypt, where this species is considered to be the main pathogen in goats, not in sheep. Additionally, it could be concluded that treatment may be effective only if given early. Further comprehensive surveys are required to investigate the risk of CCPP in goats and sheep in all Egyptian governorates.

Keywords

CCPP Mccp Pathologic lesions Oxytetracycline Sheep PCR 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical statement

The handling of animals used in the study was performed according to the accepted national and international guidelines for animal welfare.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineAlexandria UniversityEdfinaEgypt
  2. 2.Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineAlexandria UniversityEdfinaEgypt

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