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Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 51, Issue 8, pp 2629–2634 | Cite as

Molecular identification and detection of Wohlfahrtia magnifica in ovine vulvar myiasis in Gansu, China

  • Youquan LiEmail author
  • Xuan Li
  • Junlong Liu
  • Aihong Liu
  • Pengfei Guo
  • Yuan Han
  • Youjun Shang
  • Guiquan Guan
  • Zhijie Liu
  • Guangyuan Liu
  • Jianxun Luo
  • Hong Yin
Short Communications
  • 76 Downloads

Abstract

Traumatic myiasis causes substantial economic losses to farmers worldwide. In the present study, six flocks of sheep (2261 sheep) were investigated in Gansu, China, and 207 of 552 larvae were genetically characterized based on three genes, including cyt b, EF-1α, and white gene, by polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis. A survey of sheep in China revealed that the prevalence of vulvar myiasis of six sheep flocks was 5.00% (11/220, Flock1), 4.85% (10/206, Flock2), 4.50% (9/200, Flock3), 5.00% (15/300, Flock4), 4.68% (15/320, Flock5), 0% (0/1015, Flock6), respectively. The sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that only Wohlfahrtia magnifica was detected in the field samples. This is the first report of ovine vulvar myiasis caused by W. magnifica in Gansu, China. Some prophylactic measures are strongly recommended to reduce the risk of sheep acquiring traumatic myiasis in Gansu, China.

Keywords

Vulvar myiasis Wohlfahrtia magnifica Identification Sheep PCR Gansu 

Abbreviations

PCR

polymerase chain reaction

cyt b gene

cytochrome b gene

EF-1α gene

elongation factor 1-alpha gene

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank the director Jiang Zhongwen of the Bureau of Animal Husbandry in Yongchang district for their cooperation during the field-collected samples.

Funding information

This study was financially supported by the National Key R&D Program of China (2017YFD0501200, 2018YFD0501804, 2018YFD0502305, 2016YFD0501503); NBCITS (CARS-37); Special Funds for Agro-scientific Research in the Public Research (Y2018YJ08-4), MOA; ASTIP, FRIP (2014ZL010), CAAS; 973 Program (2015CB150300), MOST; and State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Etiological Biology Project.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Ethic statement

All animals were handled in strict accordance with good animal practice according to the Animal Ethics Procedures and Guidelines of the People’s Republic of China, and the study was approved by the Animal Ethics Committee of Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (No. LVRIAEC2012-003).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Youquan Li
    • 1
    Email author
  • Xuan Li
    • 1
  • Junlong Liu
    • 1
  • Aihong Liu
    • 1
  • Pengfei Guo
    • 1
  • Yuan Han
    • 1
  • Youjun Shang
    • 1
  • Guiquan Guan
    • 1
  • Zhijie Liu
    • 1
  • Guangyuan Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jianxun Luo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hong Yin
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Etiological Biology, Key Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology of Gansu Province, Lanzhou Veterinary Research InstituteChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesLanzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and ZoonosesYangzhouPeople’s Republic of China

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