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Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 51, Issue 7, pp 2057–2066 | Cite as

Pathological and microbiological characterization of mastitis in dairy cows

  • Ronaldo M. BianchiEmail author
  • Claiton I. Schwertz
  • Bianca S. de Cecco
  • Welden Panziera
  • Cíntia De Lorenzo
  • Lilian C. Heck
  • Gustavo G. M. Snel
  • Bruna C. Lopes
  • Fernando S. da Silva
  • Saulo P. Pavarini
  • David Driemeier
Regular Articles
  • 195 Downloads

Abstract

Mastitis may be caused by a wide range of microorganisms able to induce distinct lesions in mammary tissues. This study aims to characterize the gross and microscopic features of mastitis in dairy cows and to correlate them with the pathogens involved. The udders of slaughtered dairy cows were inspected and milk samples from each mammary quarter or fragments of the parenchyma were sent for microbiological analysis, and tissue collected for histopathological evaluation. A total of 148 cows and 592 mammary quarters were collected. From these, 432 quarters (73%) had mastitis and in 160 (27%), no changes were observed. Mastitis was classified into seven patterns based on the histopathological findings, of which mixed, lymphoplasmacytic, and suppurative mastitides were the most prevalent with 35.9% (155/432), 27.1% (117/432), and 14.3% (62/432) of the cases, respectively. These patterns were associated with the same set of pathogens: Streptococcus spp., coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS), Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, and Corynebacterium bovis. The pyogranulomatous pattern represented 7.2% (31/432) of the cases with distinct distribution based on the agent involved, mostly S. aureus and Nocardia sp. Abscedative mastitis accounted for 6.0% (26/432) of the cases; it was characterized by multiple abscesses in the parenchyma and was mainly caused by Trueperella pyogenes. Necrosuppurative mastitis represented 5.8% (25/432) of the cases which were characterized by severe parenchyma necrosis and were caused by bacteria such as CNS and Escherichia coli. The granulomatous pattern represented 3.7% (16/432) of the cases and was occasionally associated with Mycobacterium sp.

Keywords

Mammary gland Dairy cattle Mammary pathology Bacteria 

Notes

Funding information

This study was financially supported by the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnólogico (CNPq) and Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES).

Compliance with ethical standards

Statement of animal rights

The project that gave rise to the present data was approved to the Research Committee (COMPESQ) of the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS) (Project number 33527). The manuscript does not contain clinical studies or patient data.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronaldo M. Bianchi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Claiton I. Schwertz
    • 1
  • Bianca S. de Cecco
    • 1
  • Welden Panziera
    • 1
  • Cíntia De Lorenzo
    • 1
  • Lilian C. Heck
    • 1
  • Gustavo G. M. Snel
    • 1
  • Bruna C. Lopes
    • 1
  • Fernando S. da Silva
    • 1
  • Saulo P. Pavarini
    • 1
  • David Driemeier
    • 1
  1. 1.Setor de Patologia Veterinária, Faculdade de VeterináriaUniversidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS)Porto AlegreBrazil

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