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Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 50, Issue 6, pp 1287–1294 | Cite as

Phenotypic characterization of beef cattle breeds and production practices in Liberia

  • Arthur Bob Karnuah
  • Gregory Dunga
  • Arthur Wennah
  • Walter T. Wiles
  • Edmond Greaves
  • Roland Varkpeh
  • Richard Osei-Amponsah
  • Paul Boettcher
Regular Articles

Abstract

Phenotypic characterization of animal genetic resources (AnGR) involves identification of distinct breed populations, describing their external and production characteristics in a given environment and management, and taking into account the social and economic factors that affect them. A survey involving 346 livestock farmers was conducted in the 15 counties of Liberia to collect data on production practices and phenotypic characteristics of beef cattle. A pre-tested structured questionnaire, focus group discussions, and in-depth interviews were utilized in data collection. Phenotypic descriptors were measured using a measuring tape and weighing scale. The purpose for keeping beef cattle, preferred cattle traits, and challenges of beef cattle farmers were also assessed. Liberia’s beef cattle are predominantly of Ndama (50%), Muturu (38%), and Zebu (11%) breeds. Beef cattle are mainly kept on free range with little investment in housing, feeding, and veterinary care. Beef cattle are raised mainly for income generation, with high cost and low availability of feed (32%), insufficient housing (25%), diseases (21%), and high costs of veterinary medicines (12%) being the main challenges faced by the farmers. Liberian beef cattle were characterized as being docile (53%) or moderate (33%) in temperament, with solid/uniform coat color pattern (61%), black coat color (26%), and non-pigmented skin (84%). The animals had mainly erect or lateral ears, straight back lines, and are sloped rumps. Disease (54%) and drought tolerance (30%) were the main adaptive traits reported. The body weight of beef cattle sampled ranged from 213 to 226 kg, the body length from 119 to 122 cm, and the heart girth from 134 to 140 cm. The government of Liberia should improve policies on local AnGR management and support stakeholder institutions to ensure their sustainable use and conservation.

Keywords

Phenotypic characterization Beef cattle Production system AnGR 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We sincerely thank the farmers and respondents who participated in the project. We express our sincere appreciation to all technical staff of MOA and CARI, then the FAO Country Rep. Mr. Marc Abdala and his staff in Liberia and Mr. Jesse Yuan of FAO for his guidance and training in the utilization of EpiCollect data capture program.

Funding

This project was funded by the FAO under the Technical Cooperation Program (TCP) for Liberia (TCP/LIR/3502) with the Central Agricultural Research Institute (CARI) as the implementer.

Compliance with ethical standards

The manuscript does not contain clinical studies or patient data.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur Bob Karnuah
    • 1
  • Gregory Dunga
    • 1
  • Arthur Wennah
    • 1
  • Walter T. Wiles
    • 1
  • Edmond Greaves
    • 2
  • Roland Varkpeh
    • 2
  • Richard Osei-Amponsah
    • 3
  • Paul Boettcher
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Livestock and FisheryCentral Agricultural Research InstituteSuakokoLiberia
  2. 2.Ministry of AgricultureMonroviaLiberia
  3. 3.Department of Animal ScienceUniversity of GhanaLegonGhana
  4. 4.Animal Genetic Resources Branch, Animal Production and Health DivisionFood and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United NationsRomeItaly

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