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Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 50, Issue 6, pp 1219–1225 | Cite as

Genetic analysis of persistency in HF crossbred cattle at an organized farm of northern India

  • Nisha Sharma
  • Raman Narang
  • Neeraj Kashyap
  • Soni Kumari
  • Simarjeet Kaur
  • Poonam Ratwan
Regular Articles
  • 80 Downloads

Abstract

The present study was undertaken to estimate effect of various genetic and non-genetic factors on persistency of milk production and to identify the most appropriate persistency method that fits best in our environment. In the present study, effects of different non-genetic factors, viz. year, season, days to attain peak yield, and genetic group based on the level of exotic inheritance on persistency of milk yield in crossbred cattle were studied. Data comprised of 686 first lactation daily milk yield records of crossbred cattle that were maintained at GADVASU dairy farm over a period of 25 years from 1991 to 2015 were utilized to calculate persistency coefficients by four methods, viz., Ludwick and Peterson method (P1), Mahadevan method (P2), ratio method (P3), and Prasad et al. method (P4). Overall least squares means for persistency by Ludwick and Peterson method (P1), Mahadevan method (P2), ratio method (P3), and Prasad et al. method (P4) were 0.896 ± 0.096, 1.385 ± 0.224, 187.207 ± 26.398, and 0.621 ± 0.098, respectively. Effect of sires was significant (P < 0.05) on P2 and P4 methods. Effect of genetic group on all four methods was non-significant. Period of calving had significant (P < 0.01) effect on persistency of milk yield (P2, P3, and P4 methods). Effect of season of calving on persistency of milk yield was found to be significant in all estimates obtained by the four methods. Summer and autumn calvers were most persistent whereas spring and winter calvers were least persistent for (P2, P3, and P4 methods). Persistency of milk yield was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by days to attain peak yield in P1 and P2 methods. Maximum persistency was obtained in animals attaining peak at 41–57 days of lactation and minimum in < 41 days for Mahadevan method and ratio method. The highest heritability of persistency and minimum value of standard error was estimated as 0.275 ± 0.11 for the Mahadevan method followed by the Prasad method (0.197 ± 0.10) by half sib correlation method. The maximum coefficient of variation which indicates available variability was estimated as 20.788% for persistency by the Mahadevan method followed by 18.969% for the Prasad method. The highest correlation was also observed between P1 and P3 methods by Spearman’s and Pearson’s correlation for least squares breeding value of the sires. On the basis of heritability, standard error of heritability, and coefficient of variation, it can be concluded that the Mahadevan method followed by the Prasad method suits best to our environment for animals in first lactation as well as they can be utilized for effective selection for higher persistency in crossbred animals of Punjab.

Keywords

Persistency Daily milk yield Pearson’s correlation Spearman’s correlation Heritability 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are thankful to the Vice Chancellor of GADVASU and Head of GADVASU, Ludhiana, for providing the necessary facilities. We wish to acknowledge the hard work and sincerity of the staffs of directorate livestock farm.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Animal Genetics and Breeding DivisionICAR-National Dairy Research InstituteKarnalIndia
  2. 2.Animal Genetics and Breeding DivisionGuru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences UniversityLudhianaIndia
  3. 3.Department of Animal Genetics and BreedingGuru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences UniversityLudhianaIndia
  4. 4.Animal Genetics DivisionIndian Veterinary Research InstituteIzatnagarIndia

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