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Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 49, Issue 6, pp 1163–1169 | Cite as

Impact of black soldier fly larval meal on growth performance, apparent digestibility, haematological and blood chemistry indices of guinea fowl starter keets under tropical conditions

  • P. A. WallaceEmail author
  • J. K. Nyameasem
  • G. A. Adu-Aboagye
  • S. Affedzie-Obresi
  • E. K. Nkegbe
  • N. Karbo
  • F. Murray
  • W. Leschen
  • P. -O. Maquart
Regular Articles

Abstract

In order to assess the impact of larval meal on guinea fowl, six iso-caloric and iso-nitrogenous diets were fed to day-old-keets ad libitum till 8 weeks of age. Water was also freely provided. The fishmeal (FM) component of the experimental diets was replaced with black soldier fly larval meal (BSFLM) in the following percentage ratios of 0–100%. Results showed that body weight gain significantly (P < 0.05) increased in all the BSFLM treatment groups compared to the control group. The final body weight of the birds at age 8 weeks differed significantly (P < 0.001). Dry matter intake varied (P < 0.001) slightly among the birds but never affected (P > 0.05) ME intake and faecal output as well as weight changes of the keets. Digestibility of dry matter and energy were not affected (P > 0.05) by the differences in diet. Organ and haematopoietic integrity were assured regardless of the protein types used as well as levels of inclusion. The results suggest that the replacement of fishmeal with BSFLM in so far as the economics of production is concerned could result in reduced feed cost for starter guinea keet judging from diets that contained 60–100% BSFLM.

Keywords

Fishmeal Haematopoiesis Hermetia illucens Insect Numida meleagris 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The project team expresses sincere appreciation to the management and staff of CSIR-Animal Research Institute for the unrestrained access to its facilities, laboratories, and logistics as well as the administrative support accorded the team during the execution of the project. EDIF and University of Stirling, UK, are warmly appreciated for the funding of this study. CABI (Ghana) and West Africa Agricultural Productivity Programme (WAAPP) are profoundly appreciated for their diverse contributions made towards the success of the studies.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. A. Wallace
    • 1
    Email author
  • J. K. Nyameasem
    • 1
  • G. A. Adu-Aboagye
    • 1
  • S. Affedzie-Obresi
    • 1
  • E. K. Nkegbe
    • 1
  • N. Karbo
    • 1
  • F. Murray
    • 2
  • W. Leschen
    • 2
  • P. -O. Maquart
    • 2
  1. 1.Council for Scientific and Industrial Research - Animal Research InstituteAccraGhana
  2. 2.University of StirlingStirlingUK

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