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Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 47, Issue 2, pp 395–402 | Cite as

Seroprevalence of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in Mali

  • Amadou Séry
  • Cheick Abou Kounta Sidibé
  • Ousmane Cissé
  • Mamadou Diallo
  • Mamadou Koné
  • Agnès Waret-Szkuta
  • François Roger
  • François Thiaucourt
  • Mamadou NiangEmail author
Regular Articles

Abstract

A serological survey to determine the prevalence of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in Mali was carried out by using the competitive enzyme linked-immunosorbent test (c-ELISA) on 8007 serum samples systematically collected from 199 cattle herds collected throughout the whole country. Results showed a national prevalence of 18.11 % at the individual level and 85.93 % at the herd level. Significant variations in the individual prevalence were observed between regions of the country and ranged from 4.63 % in Tombouctou to 54.88 % in Kidal. At the herd level, although there were variations between regions, a high prevalence was constantly observed ranging from 60 to 100 %, hence confirming the endemic nature of the disease across the country. The CBPP risk varied also between regions and was very low in Tombouctou (odds ratio (OR) = 0.4) but very high in Kidal (OR = 9.8). Similarly, the risk seemed higher in the animals of the over 3-year age group (OR = 1.6) compared to the other age groups. It was also observed that there was a slightly higher risk (OR = 1.3) in the females than in the males. This study confirms the presence of CBPP across the country and should help to elaborate strategies for the effective control of the disease.

Keywords

Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) Epidemiology Seroprevalence c-ELISA Mali 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank the late Dr. B. Seck (CRSA, FAO-ECTAD, Bamako, Mali), Dr. O. Diall (FAO, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia), Dr. W. Amanfu (FAO, retired animal health officer, Accra, Ghana), and Dr. N. Panchaud (visiting scientist from Switzerland, LCV, Bamako, Mali) for their editorial review of the manuscript. This work was supported principally by the Government of Mali through the programme “dAppui aux Services Agricoles et aux Organisations Paysannes (PASAOP)” of the World Bank.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amadou Séry
    • 1
  • Cheick Abou Kounta Sidibé
    • 1
  • Ousmane Cissé
    • 1
  • Mamadou Diallo
    • 1
  • Mamadou Koné
    • 1
  • Agnès Waret-Szkuta
    • 2
  • François Roger
    • 3
  • François Thiaucourt
    • 4
  • Mamadou Niang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Laboratoire Central VétérinaireBamakoMali
  2. 2.INP-ENVTUMR 1225 IHAPToulouse CedexFrance
  3. 3.Cirad-AGIRsUPR22, TA C-22/E, Campus International de BaillarguetMontpellier Cedex 5France
  4. 4.Cirad-CMAEEUMR15, TA A-15/G, Campus International de BaillarguetMontpellier Cedex 5France

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