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Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 46, Issue 2, pp 467–473 | Cite as

Seroprevalence and risk factors associated with Chlamydophila spp. infection in ewes in the northeast of Algeria

  • Sana Hireche
  • Omar Bouaziz
  • Djahida Djenna
  • Sabrina Boussena
  • Rachida Aimeur
  • Rachid Kabouia
  • El Hacène Bererhi
Regular Articles

Abstract

A cross-sectional study was carried out to estimate prevalence of Chlamydophila spp. antibodies and to investigate risk factors associated with chlamydial infection in 552 ewes between March 2011 and January 2012 in the province of Constantine. Anti-Chlamydophila antibodies were detected using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit in 24.5 % of examined sera. Of the herds, 70.4 % had at least one seropositive animal. A pretested structured questionnaire was administered in order to collect information on individual animal health and herd management practices. Chi-square analysis and multivariable logistic regression model were used to identify risk factors related to Chlamydophila seropositivity. Univariable analysis revealed 17 variables with p < 0.25 that were offered to the multivariable logistic regression model which in turn identified 12–23 months age group (OR = 5.903, 95 % CI (OR) = 1.690; 20.618) and not using disinfectants (OR = 2.099, 95 % CI (OR) = 1.314; 8.065) as risk factors for Chlamydophila spp. seropositivity. Moreover, occurrence of stillbirth problem (OR = 3.682, 95 % CI (OR) = 1.825; 7.430) and 5–10 % mortality rate in young lambs (OR = 2.584, 95 % CI (OR) = 1.058; 6.310) were significantly associated with seropositivity to Chlamydophila spp. On the other hand, availability of veterinary service was identified as a protective factor (OR = 0.161, 95 % CI (OR) = 0.051; 0.511).

Keywords

Chlamydophila spp. Ewes Seroprevalence Risk factors Constantine 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was financed by the Algerian Directorate General for Scientific Research and Technological Development under national research projects PNR (code 1/u250/342). We are very grateful to farm owners and workers for their readiness to participate in this study and for providing us with relevant information about their animals for promoting scientific research.

Conflict of interest

None of the authors of this paper has a financial or personal relationship with other people or organizations that could inappropriately influence or bias the content of the paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sana Hireche
    • 1
  • Omar Bouaziz
    • 1
  • Djahida Djenna
    • 2
  • Sabrina Boussena
    • 1
  • Rachida Aimeur
    • 1
  • Rachid Kabouia
    • 1
  • El Hacène Bererhi
    • 1
  1. 1.Management of Animal Health and Productions Laboratory, Institute of Veterinary SciencesUniversity of Constantine 1ConstantineAlgeria
  2. 2.Veterinary Inspection of ConstantineConstantineAlgeria

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