Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 46, Issue 1, pp 271–277 | Cite as

Molecular epidemiology of Newcastle disease viruses in Vietnam

  • Kang-Seuk Choi
  • Soo-Jeong Kye
  • Ji-Ye Kim
  • Thanh Long To
  • Dang Tho Nguyen
  • Youn-Jeong Lee
  • Jun-Gu Choi
  • Hyun-Mi Kang
  • Kwang-Il Kim
  • Byung-Min Song
  • Hee-Soo Lee
Short Communications

Abstract

Newcastle disease virus (NDV) causes significant economic losses to the poultry industry in Southeast Asia. In the present study, 12 field isolates of NDV were recovered from dead village chickens in Vietnam between 2007 and 2012, and were characterized. All the field isolates were classified as velogenic. Based on the sequence analysis of the F variable region, two distinct genetic groups (Vietnam genetic groups G1 and G2) were recognized. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the 12 field isolates fell into the class II genotype VII cluster. Ten of the field isolates, classified as Vietnam genetic group G1, were closely related to VIIh viruses that had been isolated from Indonesia, Malaysia, and Cambodia since the mid-2000s, while the other two field isolates, of Vietnam genetic group G2, clustered with VIId viruses, which were predominantly circulating in China and Far East Asia. Our results indicate that genotype VII viruses, especially VIIh viruses, are predominantly responsible for the recent epizootic of the disease in Vietnam.

Keywords

Newcastle disease virus Molecular epidemiology Phylogenetic analysis Vietnam 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kang-Seuk Choi
    • 1
  • Soo-Jeong Kye
    • 1
  • Ji-Ye Kim
    • 1
  • Thanh Long To
    • 2
  • Dang Tho Nguyen
    • 2
  • Youn-Jeong Lee
    • 1
  • Jun-Gu Choi
    • 1
  • Hyun-Mi Kang
    • 1
  • Kwang-Il Kim
    • 1
  • Byung-Min Song
    • 1
  • Hee-Soo Lee
    • 1
  1. 1.Avian Diseases Division, Animal and Plant Quarantine AgencyAnyangRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.National Center for Veterinary Diagnosis, Department of Animal HealthHanoiVietnam

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