Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 44, Issue 3, pp 601–608

Characterization of indigenous chicken production systems in Kenya

  • Tobias O. Okeno
  • Alexander K. Kahi
  • Kurt J. Peters
Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s11250-011-9942-x

Cite this article as:
Okeno, T.O., Kahi, A.K. & Peters, K.J. Trop Anim Health Prod (2012) 44: 601. doi:10.1007/s11250-011-9942-x

Abstract

Indigenous chicken (IC) and their production systems were characterized to understand how the whole system operates for purposes of identifying threats and opportunities for holistic improvement. A survey involving 594 households was conducted in six counties with the highest population of IC in Kenya using structured questionnaires. Data on IC farmers’ management practices were collected and analysed and inbreeding levels calculated based on the effective population size. Indigenous chicken were ranked highest as a source of livestock income by households in medium- to high-potential agricultural areas, but trailed goats in arid and semi-arid areas. The production system practised was mainly low-input and small-scale free range, with mean flock size of 22.40 chickens per household. The mean effective population size was 16.02, translating to high levels of inbreeding (3.12%). Provision for food and cash income were the main reasons for raising IC, whilst high mortality due to diseases, poor nutrition, housing and marketing channels were the major constraints faced by farmers. Management strategies targeting improved healthcare, nutrition and housing require urgent mitigation measures, whilst rural access road network needs to be developed for ease of market accessibility. Sustainable genetic improvement programmes that account for farmers’ multiple objectives, market requirements and the production circumstances should be developed for a full realization of IC productivity.

Keywords

Characterization Indigenous chicken Production systems 

Abbreviations

IC

Indigenous chicken

ASALs

Arid and semi-arid areas

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tobias O. Okeno
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alexander K. Kahi
    • 2
  • Kurt J. Peters
    • 1
  1. 1.Animal Breeding in the Tropics and Sub-Tropics, Department of Crops and Livestock SciencesHumboldt Universitaet zu BerlinBerlinGermany
  2. 2.Animal Breeding and Genetics Group, Department of Animal ScienceEgerton UniversityEgertonKenya

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