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Socio-economic factors influencing the use of acaricides on livestock: a case study of the pastoralist communities of Nakasongola District, Central Uganda

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Abstract

A study was conducted in Nakasongola district to determine socioeconomic factors that influence the use of acaricides on livestock. The information was got through focus group discussions (FGDs) and use of a questionnaire. Questionnaire was administered to one hundred households. Acaricides were used to kill ticks and biting flies which transmit diseases and cause discomfort to livestock. But to a less extent was also done for cosmetic purposes. Most of the farmers were aware of the correct acaricide dilutions as recommended by the manufacturers but they ignored them. But through trial and error came up with their own dilutions, which they said were very cost-effective. Further, they experimented on concoctions of different acaricide mixes and came up with acaricide combinations which were more effective in killing ticks and flies. Veterinarians and acaricide manufacturing companies had called this a malpractice. On the contrary, this should be treated as an innovation by farmers in their endeavour to find a cheaper sustainable method of controlling ticks and flies. Further research should therefore be done on these working “malpractices”.

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Abbreviations

ECF:

East Coast Fever

FGDs:

Focus Group Discussions

MAAIF:

Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries

TBDs:

Tick Borne Diseases

TTBDs:

Ticks and Tick Borne Diseases

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Acknowledgement

We wish to thank Dr James Bugeza, (Veterinary Officer, Nakasongola district) whose kind assistance made this work possible. Similarly we thank Dr N Kauta who extended great support to us for the entire process. Last but not least we thank all members of the farming community in Nakasongola district with whom we interacted and gave us good quality data.

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Correspondence to Kenneth N. Mugabi.

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Mugabi, K.N., Mugisha, A. & Ocaido, M. Socio-economic factors influencing the use of acaricides on livestock: a case study of the pastoralist communities of Nakasongola District, Central Uganda. Trop Anim Health Prod 42, 131 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11250-009-9396-6

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Keywords

  • Acaricide
  • Livestock
  • Ticks and tick borne diseases control
  • Socio-economic factors