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Transgenic Research

, Volume 22, Issue 5, pp 1011–1019 | Cite as

Muscle-specific transgenic expression of porcine myostatin propeptide enhances muscle growth in mice

  • Kaiyun Wang
  • Zicong Li
  • Yang Li
  • Jinyong Zeng
  • Chang He
  • Jinzeng Yang
  • Dewu Liu
  • Zhenfang WuEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Myostatin is a well-known negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. Inhibition of myostatin activity results in increased muscle mass. Myostatin propeptide, as a myostatin antagonist, could be applied to promote meat production in livestock such as pigs. In this study, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing porcine myostatin propeptide under the control of muscle-specific regulatory elements. The mean body weight of transgenic mice from a line expressing the highest level of porcine myostatin propeptide was increased by 5.4 % (P = 0.023) and 3.2 % (P = 0.031) in males and females, respectively, at 8 weeks of age. Weight of carcass, fore limb and hind limb was respectively increased by 6.0 % (P = 0.038), 9.0 % (P = 0.014), 8.7 % (P = 0.036) in transgenic male mice, compared to wild-type male controls at the age of 9 weeks. Similarly, carcass, fore limb and hind limb of transgenic female mice was 11.4 % (P = 0.002), 14.5 % (P = 0.006) and 14.5 % (P = 0.03) respectively heavier than that of wild-type female mice. The mean cross-section area of muscle fiber was increased by 17 % (P = 0.002) in transgenic mice, in comparison with wild-type controls. These results demonstrated that porcine myostatin propeptide is effective in enhancement of muscle growth. The present study provided useful information for future study on generation of transgenic pigs overexpressing porcine myostatin propeptide for improvement of muscle mass.

Keywords

Myostatin propeptide Muscle mass Transgenic mice Pig 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by a Grant from the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (“863” Program, Grant Number: 2011AA100304), a Grant from the National Science Foundation for Young Scholars of China (Grant Number: 31101689), a Grant from Department of Science and Technology of Guangdong (Grant Number: 2008A024200012), and a Grant from Department of Science and Technology of Guangdong (Grant Number: 2011A020901001), and a Grant from Foundation for Distinguished Young Talents in Higher Education of Guangdong (Grant Number: S11-L11-12603).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kaiyun Wang
    • 1
  • Zicong Li
    • 1
  • Yang Li
    • 1
  • Jinyong Zeng
    • 1
  • Chang He
    • 1
  • Jinzeng Yang
    • 2
  • Dewu Liu
    • 1
  • Zhenfang Wu
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, College of Animal ScienceSouth China Agricultural UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal SciencesUniversity of Hawaii at ManoaHonoluluUSA

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