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Transgenic Research

, Volume 19, Issue 4, pp 637–645 | Cite as

GADD34 suppresses wound healing by upregulating expression of myosin IIA

  • Chie Tanaka
  • Sachiko Ito
  • Naomi Nishio
  • Yasuhiro Kodera
  • Hidetoshi Sakurai
  • Haruhiko Suzuki
  • Akimasa Nakao
  • Ken-Ichi Isobe
Original Paper

Abstract

Wound healing consists of sequential steps of tissue repair, and cell migration is particularly important. In order to analyze the potential function of growth arrest and DNA damage inducible protein 34 (GADD34) in tissue repair, we performed in vitro and in vivo wound healing experiments. In an in vitro scratch assay, GADD34 knockout (KO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) had higher migration rates than did wild type (WT) MEFs. Furthermore, the rate of wound closure was faster in GADD34 KO MEFs than in WT MEFs. Using in vivo punch biopsy assays, GADD34 KO mice had accelerated wound healing compared to WT mice. WT mice expressed higher amounts of myosin IIA in migrating macrophages and myofibroblasts than did GADD34 KO mice. These results indicate that GADD34 negatively regulates cell migration in wound healing via expression of myosin IIA.

Keywords

GADD34 Wound healing Cell migration Myosin 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank M. Tanaka for technical assistance with confocal imaging. This work was supported by the Ministry of Education, Science, Technology, Sports and Culture, Japan

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chie Tanaka
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sachiko Ito
    • 1
  • Naomi Nishio
    • 1
  • Yasuhiro Kodera
    • 2
  • Hidetoshi Sakurai
    • 1
  • Haruhiko Suzuki
    • 1
  • Akimasa Nakao
    • 2
  • Ken-Ichi Isobe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ImmunologyNagoya University Graduate School of MedicineNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Surgery IINagoya University Graduate School of MedicineNagoyaJapan

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