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Topoi

, Volume 35, Issue 2, pp 367–374 | Cite as

Fostering the Virtues of Inquiry

  • Sharon Bailin
  • Mark Battersby
Article
  • 612 Downloads

Abstract

This paper examines what constitute the virtues of argumentation or critical thinking and how these virtues might be developed. We argue first that the notion of virtue is more appropriate for characterizing this aspect than the notion of dispositions commonly employed by critical thinking theorists and, further, that it is more illuminating to speak of the virtues of inquiry rather than of argumentation. Our central argument is that learning to think critically is a matter of learning to participate knowledgeably and competently in the practice of inquiry in its various forms and contexts. Acquiring the virtues of inquiry arises through getting on the inside of the practice and coming to appreciate the goods inherent in the practice.

Keywords

Argumentation Critical thinking Inquiry Virtues Practice Community of inquiry Pedagogy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationSimon Fraser UniversityVancouverCanada
  2. 2.Critical Inquiry GroupCapilano UniversityVancouverCanada

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