Topoi

, Volume 31, Issue 2, pp 221–227 | Cite as

Politics and Practical Wisdom: Rethinking Aristotle’s Account of Phronesis

Article

Abstract

This paper examines the nature of Aristotelian phronesis, how it is attained, and who is able to attain it inside the polis. I argue that, for Aristotle, attaining phronesis does not require an individual to perfect his practical wisdom to the point where he never makes a mistake, but rather it is attained by certain individuals who are unable to make a mistake of this kind due to their education, habituation, and position in society.

Keywords

Aristotle Phronesis Practical wisdom Political science 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyTulane UniversityNew OrleansUSA

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