Real-Time Systems

, Volume 48, Issue 3, pp 320–358 | Cite as

Feasibility analysis of real-time transactions

  • Ahmed Rahni
  • Emmanuel Grolleau
  • Michaël Richard
  • Pascal Richard
Article

Abstract

The objective of this paper is two-fold: give a survey of response time analysis (RTA), and contribute to schedulability analysis for the real-time transaction model. The RTA is studied under fixed priority policies (FPP), while schedulability analysis assumes an optimal scheduling algorithm (like the deadline driven scheduling algorithm EDF) in a preemptive context on uniprocessor systems. We compare the transaction model to the family of multiframe models, then present the exact, and approximated methods, as well as a tunable method to compute the RTA. Finally we present a new schedulability analysis method and an efficient algorithm to speed up this test.

Keywords

Response time analysis Processor demand Real-time transactions Tasks with offsets Fixed Priority Policy Deadline Driven Scheduling 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ahmed Rahni
    • 1
  • Emmanuel Grolleau
    • 2
  • Michaël Richard
    • 2
  • Pascal Richard
    • 2
  1. 1.AKKA TechnologiesNantesFrance
  2. 2.LIASENSMA-Université de PoitiersFuturoscope Chasseneuil CedexFrance

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