Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture (PCTOC)

, Volume 125, Issue 3, pp 595–598 | Cite as

Eliciting effect of jasmonates from Botryosphaeria rhodina enhances coumarin production in Mikania laevigata plants

  • Miriam Verginia Lourenço
  • Wellington Soares
  • Bianca Waleria Bertoni
  • Ana Paula Oliveira
  • Sarazete Izidia Vaz Pereira
  • Ana Maria Soares Pereira
  • Suzelei Castro Franca
Research Note

Abstract

The use of elicitors has become a valuable strategy to enhance the production of plant bioactive compounds. In this work jasmonic acid solutions and extracts containing jasmonates produced by Botryosphaeria rhodina were used to elicit coumarin accumulation in Mikania laevigata. Plants cultured inside a greenhouse under monitored environmental conditions were sprayed with jasmonic acid (JA) solutions (100 or 200 µM) or with B. rhodina fungal extracts (JE) containing equivalent concentrations of JA. After 1, 7 and 30 days of exposure elicited plants were extracted and HPLC/DAD analyzed to establish the chemical profile of constituents. Yields of coumarin in elicited plants were determined and it was observed that the coumarin production was influenced by JA concentration and plant exposure period, being significantly increased (16.98 and 24.76 mg/g DW) in plants elicited for 30 days with JE containing 100 and 200 µM of JA, respectively. Compared to control, the production of coumarin in elicited plants was 1.6 and 2.3 fold higher, respectively. Obtained results demonstrate that B. rhodina fungal extracts notably enhance coumarin production in M. laevigata. Overall results in this work corroborate the eliciting effect of jasmonates on the production of secondary metabolites in plants. Those findings support the development of an eco-friendly product containing JE, which could be applied to fertilize medicinal plant cultures and to enhance the production bioactives to be used as constituents in the formulation of innovative phytochemicals.

Keywords

Mikania laevigata Coumarin Jasmonates Jasmonic acid Elicitation 

Abbreviations

JA

Jasmonic acid

JE

Botryosphaeria rhodina fungal extracts

Supplementary material

11240_2016_960_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (315 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 315 kb)
11240_2016_960_MOESM2_ESM.docx (16 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOCX 15 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miriam Verginia Lourenço
    • 1
  • Wellington Soares
    • 1
  • Bianca Waleria Bertoni
    • 1
  • Ana Paula Oliveira
    • 1
  • Sarazete Izidia Vaz Pereira
    • 1
  • Ana Maria Soares Pereira
    • 1
  • Suzelei Castro Franca
    • 1
  1. 1.Unidade de BiotecnologiaUniversidade de Ribeirão Preto - UNAERPRibeirão PretoBrazil

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