Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture (PCTOC)

, Volume 107, Issue 1, pp 123–129

Cytokinin and explant types influence in vitro plant regeneration of Leopard Orchid (Ansellia africana Lindl.)

Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11240-011-9964-0

Cite this article as:
Vasudevan, R. & Van Staden, J. Plant Cell Tiss Organ Cult (2011) 107: 123. doi:10.1007/s11240-011-9964-0

Abstract

The effects of explant and cytokinin types on in vitro plant regeneration of Ansellia africana were investigated. The exogenous addition of cytokinins is not required for the proliferation of new protocorms from Trimmed protocorm cluster (TPC) explants. To the contrary, nodal and shoot-tip explants produced a single shoot in response to the addition of cytokinins. Overall plant growth in terms of shoot length, leaf number, frequency of root organogenesis, root length, and fresh weight/plant were significantly higher in media containing meta-Topolin Riboside (mTR) in both nodal and shoot-tip explants. Thidiazuron (TDZ) and 6-benzyladenine (BA) induced stunted and hypertrophied shoots at their highest level (15 μM). In addition root differentiation and root growth were significantly lower on P668 media with TDZ and BA. Zeatin was capable of inducing a significantly higher root organogenesis frequency and root length in TPC explants as compared to other cytokinins. However, TPC explants produced a significantly greater number of longer shoots (>3 cm) on P668 media with mTR. Hyperhydric shoots were produced from TPC explants. The occurrence of hyperhydricity is discussed with respect to the culture vessel used in this study.

Keywords

Adventitious shoot Ansellia africana Hyperhydricity meta-topolin riboside (mTR) Trimmed protocorm cluster (TPC) 

Abbreviations

BA

6-benzyladenine

DMRT

Duncan’s multiple range test

mTR

meta-topolin riboside

P668

Phytotechnology medium

TDZ

Thidiazuron

TPC

Trimmed protocorm cluster

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research Centre for Plant Growth and Development, School of Biological and Conservation SciencesUniversity of KwaZulu-Natal PietermaritzburgScottsvilleSouth Africa

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