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In vitro evaluation of osmotic stress tolerance using a novel root recovery assay

  • Hideki Maruyama
  • Ryohei Koyama
  • Takeru Oi
  • Masafumi Yagi
  • Migiwa Takeda
  • Michio Kanechi
  • Noboru Inagaki
  • Yuichi Uno
Original Paper

Abstract

We established a novel in vitro method, termed the root recovery assay, to evaluate the survival under osmotic stress of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings. Under salinity and drought stress, combination of the root-bending assay and root recovery assay showed the same trends in dry weight and survival rate as a hydroponic culture. Both in vitro assays and hydroponics ranked the three lettuce cultivars in the same order of drought tolerance. The root-bending assay evaluated the plant’s growth and the root recovery assay indicated the plant’s survival. In addition, the combined assay required less space and approximately half the time period compared with the hydroponic culture. These results suggested that application of the root-bending and root recovery assay should be a rapid and space-saving method with which to evaluate the osmotic stress tolerance of lettuce from both growth and survival standpoints.

Keywords

Drought stress Growth Lettuce Root-bending assay Salinity stress Survival 

Abbreviations

cv.

Cultivar

MS

Murashige and Skoog

PEG

Polyethylene glycol

Notes

Acknowledgement

This work was supported in part by a grant from the Salt Science Research Foundation No. 0513.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hideki Maruyama
    • 1
  • Ryohei Koyama
    • 2
  • Takeru Oi
    • 2
  • Masafumi Yagi
    • 2
    • 3
  • Migiwa Takeda
    • 2
    • 4
  • Michio Kanechi
    • 1
  • Noboru Inagaki
    • 1
  • Yuichi Uno
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Resource Science, Graduate School of Agricultural ScienceKOBE UniversityKobeJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of Science and TechnologyKOBE UniversityKobeJapan
  3. 3.National Institute of Floricultural ScienceTsukubaJapan
  4. 4.Kazusa DNA Research InstituteChibaJapan

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