Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture

, Volume 91, Issue 3, pp 289–294 | Cite as

Phytodecta fornicata Brüggemann resistance mediated by oryzacystatin II proteinase inhibitor transgene

  • Slavica Ninković
  • Jovanka Miljuš-Đukić
  • Svetlana Radović
  • Vesna Maksimović
  • Jelica Lazarević
  • Branka Vinterhalter
  • Mirjana Nešković
  • Ann Smigocki
Original Paper

Abstract

Phytodecta fornicata Brüggemann is a serious pest of alfalfa (Medicagosativa L.) that causes significant crop loss in the Balkan peninsula of Europe. We introduced a wound-inducible oryzacystatin II (OCII) gene to alfalfa to evaluate its effect on survival of P. fornicata larvae. Feeding bioassays with second, third and fourth instars were carried out using transgenic plants that were shown to express OCII at 24 and 48 h after wounding. Second and third instars were the most sensitive to the ingestion of OCII, whereas no effects were observed with fourth instars. About 80% of the second and third instars died after 2 days of feeding on the transgenic plants as compared to 0–40% on the controls. This is the first report that demonstrates significant increase in mortality of P. fornicata on transgenic plants that express a cysteine proteinase inhibitor gene, and this knowledge should lead to the development of effective management strategies for this devastating pest of alfalfa.

Keywords

Alfalfa Cystatin Leaf beetle Second instars Transgenic plants 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Slavica Ninković
    • 1
  • Jovanka Miljuš-Đukić
    • 2
  • Svetlana Radović
    • 2
  • Vesna Maksimović
    • 2
  • Jelica Lazarević
    • 1
  • Branka Vinterhalter
    • 1
  • Mirjana Nešković
    • 1
  • Ann Smigocki
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute for Biological Research “S. Stanković”University of BelgradeBelgradeSerbia
  2. 2.Institute for Genetics and Genetic EngineeringBelgradeSerbia
  3. 3.Molecular Plant Pathology LaboratoryUSDA-ARSBeltsvilleUSA

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