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Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis

, Volume 43, Issue 4, pp 437–445 | Cite as

Determination of non-Vitamin K oral anticoagulant (NOAC) effects using a new-generation thrombelastography TEG 6s system

  • Kevin P. Bliden
  • Rahul Chaudhary
  • Nafees Mohammed
  • Adina A. Muresan
  • Carlos G. Lopez-Espina
  • Eli Cohen
  • Gabriel Raviv
  • Marc Doubleday
  • Fowzia Zaman
  • Blessy Mathew
  • Udaya S. Tantry
  • Paul A. GurbelEmail author
Article

Abstract

Non vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) do not require regular monitoring but information about their pharmacodynamic effect may be importantin situations like trauma, stroke oremergent surgery. Currently, no standardized point-of-care test is available to evaluate the anticoagulant effects of NOACs. We evaluated the anticoagulant effect of NOACs with the next generation point-of-care TEG assay (TEG® 6S) based on a fully-automated thrombelastography system. We used two TEG® 6S assays, the DTI assay and Anti-Factor Xa (AFXa) assay, to detect anticoagulant effects and classify NOACs. Blood from healthy volunteers (n = 26) was used to obtain a baseline reference range. Data derived from patients on factor Xa inhibitors (FXi) (rivaroxaban and apixaban) (n = 39), and direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs) (dabigatran) (n = 25) were compared against the reference range for detection of drug effect and drug classification. TEG®6s R-time highly correlated to each NOAC. Presence of NOACs caused elongation of R-time on the AFXa assay compared to the reference range (4.3 ± 1.7 vs. 1.3 ± 0.3 min. for FXi, p < 0.001 and 3.5 ± 1.2 vs. 1.3 ± 0.3 min. for DTI, p < 0.001). R-time on the DTI assay was elongated only in presence of a DTI (3.4 ± 1.0 vs. 1.5 ± 0.2 min, p < 0.001). The cutoff for detection of a DTI effect was an R time of 1.9 min and for anti-Xa effect was 1.95 min. For detection of NOAC therapy, there was ≥92% sensitivity and ≥95% specificity. The automated TEG®6s NOAC assay may be an effective tool to identify an anticoagulant effect from NOAC therapy and facilitate care of patients with bleeding or at risk of bleeding in the event of needing emergency surgery.

Keywords

Thrombelastography TEG-6s Novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) Point-of-care 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We wish to acknowledge our research coordinators, Tania Gesheff, Kiran Kalra, and Cescelle Barbour for their contributions to the study and Ms. Abby Jones for her technical assistance.

Funding

This study was funded by Coramed Technologies.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Paul Gurbel reports serving as a consultant for Daiichi Sankyo/Lilly, Bayer, AstraZeneca, Accumetrics, Merck, Medtronic, Janssen, CSL, and Haemonetics; receiving grants from the National Institutes of Health, Daiichi Sankyo, Lilly, CSL, AstraZeneca, Haemetics, Harvard Clinical Research Institute, and Duke Clinical Research Institute; receiving payment for lectures, including service on speakers’ bureaus, from Lilly, Daiichi Sankyo, and Merck; receiving payment for development of educational presentations from Merck, the Discovery Channel, and Pri-Med; Dr. Gurbel is holding stock or stock options in Merck, Medtronic, and Pfizer; and holding patents in the area of personalized antiplatelet therapy and interventional cardiology. Ms. Muresan, Mr. Lopez-Espina, Ms. Cohen and Mr. Raviv are employees at Coramed Technologies. Mr. Doubleday is an employee at Haemonetics Corporation. Other authors report no disclosures.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kevin P. Bliden
    • 1
  • Rahul Chaudhary
    • 1
  • Nafees Mohammed
    • 1
  • Adina A. Muresan
    • 2
  • Carlos G. Lopez-Espina
    • 2
  • Eli Cohen
    • 3
  • Gabriel Raviv
    • 3
  • Marc Doubleday
    • 2
  • Fowzia Zaman
    • 2
  • Blessy Mathew
    • 2
  • Udaya S. Tantry
    • 1
  • Paul A. Gurbel
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Interventional Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine Research, Inova Center for Thrombosis Research and Drug DevelopmentInova Heart and Vascular InstituteFalls ChurchUSA
  2. 2.Haemonetics CorporationBraintreeUSA
  3. 3.Coramed TechnologiesNilesUSA

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