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Telecommunication Systems

, Volume 69, Issue 2, pp 237–251 | Cite as

A secure wireless mission critical networking system for unmanned aerial vehicle communications

  • Jahangir H. SarkerEmail author
  • Ahmed M. Nahhas
Article
  • 144 Downloads

Abstract

A privacy-preserving secure communication in ad hoc (without infrastructure) mission critical wireless networking system suitable for unmanned aerial vehicle communication systems is introduced and analyzed. It is expected that in a critical condition, few ad hoc (without infrastructure) mission critical wireless networking systems will work together. To make the simple and low cost privacy-preserving secure communication among the same network, each transmitting mobile node generates packets in such a way that its wanted receiving mobile nodes can read the message packets easily. On the other hand, the unwanted receiving mobile nodes from other networks cannot read those message packets. In addition, the unwanted receiving mobile nodes receive ‘jamming packets’ if they try to read them. This mechanism prevents the malicious receivers (readers from other networks) from reading the packets and obtaining information from this network. Results show that the throughput is very high and does not detect any jamming packets, if the receiving nodes of a network try to read packets transmitted by the nodes from the same networks.

Keywords

Ad hoc networking Capture ratio Mission critical Receiving probability Transmitting Secure communication Receivers Slotted ALOHA 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Engineering at Al-LithUmm Al Qura UniversityMakkahKingdom of Saudi Arabia
  2. 2.College of Engineering and Islamic ArchitectureUmm Al Qura UniversityMakkahKingdom of Saudi Arabia

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