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Systematic Parasitology

, Volume 96, Issue 3, pp 327–335 | Cite as

Identification of Gangesia oligonchis Roitman & Freze, 1964 (Cestoda: Onchoproteocephalidea) from Tachysurus fulvidraco Richardson in central China: implications for the validity of Gangesia pseudobagrae Chen, 1962

  • Pei P. Fu
  • Wen X. LiEmail author
  • Hong Zou
  • Dong Zhang
  • Shan G. Wu
  • Ming Li
  • Gui T. Wang
  • Bing W. Xi
Article
  • 20 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Cestoda

Abstract

Owing to the brief and incomplete original description of Gangesia pseudobagrae Chen, 1962 (Cestoda: Onchoproteocephalidea) and high morphological similarity to Gangesia oligonchis Roitman & Freze, 1964 parasitising the same host Tachysurus fulvidraco Richardson, the taxonomic validity of G. pseudobagrae in China remains questionable. Therefore, we sampled and identified specimens of Gangesia Woodland, 1924 from the intestine of T. fulvidraco from three lakes in central China. Morphologically, the sampled specimens almost perfectly corresponded both to G. oligonchis and the limited available description of G. pseudobagrae: rostellum-like organ armed with a single complete circle of hooks (24–31 in number); four uniloculate suckers covered with minute hooklets; genital pore irregularly alternated; testes medullary, spherical to oval; ovary medullary, bi-lobed, follicular; cirrus-sac thick-walled and long; uterus medullary. 28S rDNA sequence also exhibited the highest similarity to G. oligonchis (99.4–99.7%). Phylogenetic analysis showed that 11 individuals of Gangesia from the three lakes in China clustered with G. oligonchis from Russia (no sequence of G. pseudobagrae available on GenBank). Based upon the high similarity of morphology and high similarity of 28S rDNA sequences, the specimens of Gangesia from T. fulvidraco in central China were identified as G. oligonchis. Our results indicate that there is only one species of Gangesia in T. fulvidraco from the Palaearctic region, and thereby support the proposed synonymisation of G. pseudobagrae and G. oligonchis.

Notes

Funding

This work was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31872604, 31572658) and the Earmarked Fund for China Agriculture Research System (CARS-45-15).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All applicable institutional, national and international guidelines for the care and use of animals were followed.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pei P. Fu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wen X. Li
    • 1
    Email author
  • Hong Zou
    • 1
  • Dong Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shan G. Wu
    • 1
  • Ming Li
    • 1
  • Gui T. Wang
    • 1
  • Bing W. Xi
    • 3
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Aquaculture Disease Control, Ministry of Agriculture, and State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of HydrobiologyChinese Academy of SciencesWuhanPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.University of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Freshwater Fisheries Research CenterChinese Academy of Fishery SciencesWuxiPeople’s Republic of China

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