Systematic Parasitology

, Volume 95, Issue 4, pp 383–389 | Cite as

A new species of Cystoisospora Frenkel, 1977 (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from Oecomys mamorae Thomas (Rodentia: Cricetidae) in the Brazilian Pantanal

  • Wanessa Teixeira Gomes Barreto
  • Gisele Braziliano de Andrade
  • Lúcio André Viana
  • Grasiela Edith de Oliveira Porfírio
  • Filipe Martins Santos
  • Alessandra Cabral Perdomo
  • Jéssica Soares do Carmo
  • Alanderson Rodrigues da Silva
  • Taynara Rocha Maltezo
  • Heitor Miraglia Herrera
Article
  • 31 Downloads

Abstract

Despite the great diversity of coccidians, to our knowledge, no coccidian infections have been described in Oecomys spp. In this context, we examined Oecomys mamorae Thomas (Rodentia: Cricetidae) from the Brazilian Pantanal for infections with enteric coccidia. Nine individuals were sampled, and one was found to be infected. The oöcysts were recovered through centrifugal flotation in sugar solution. Using morphological and morphometric features, we described a new species of Cystoisospora Frenkel, 1977. Sporulated oöcysts were ovoidal 20.0–29.1 × 16.4–23.2 (26.7 × 21.2) µm and contained two sporocysts, 12.9–19.1 × 9.4–13.9 (16.4 × 12.4) µm, each with four banana-shaped sporozoites. Polar granule and oöcyst residuum were both absent. We documented the developmental forms in the small intestine and described the histopathological lesions in the enteric tract. Our results indicate that the prevalence of Cystoisospora mamorae n. sp. in O. mamorae is low, and tissue damage in the enteric tract is mild, even in the presence of coccidian developmental stages.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The first author thanks Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES) by the grant support (Grant Number 00.889.834/0001-08).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

The capture and sample collection had permission from the Instituto Chico Mendes de Conservação da Biodiversidade (ICMBio) (SISBIO license number 38787-1 and 38145), in accordance to Brazilian regulations. All animal handling procedures followed the Guidelines of the American Society of Mammalogists. This study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Universidade Católica Dom Bosco/UCDB (013/2016).

Supplementary material

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Supplementary material 1 (PDF 462 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wanessa Teixeira Gomes Barreto
    • 1
  • Gisele Braziliano de Andrade
    • 1
  • Lúcio André Viana
    • 2
  • Grasiela Edith de Oliveira Porfírio
    • 1
  • Filipe Martins Santos
    • 1
  • Alessandra Cabral Perdomo
    • 1
  • Jéssica Soares do Carmo
    • 1
  • Alanderson Rodrigues da Silva
    • 1
  • Taynara Rocha Maltezo
    • 1
  • Heitor Miraglia Herrera
    • 1
  1. 1.Universidade Católica Dom Bosco (UCDB)Mato Grosso do SulBrasil
  2. 2.Departamento de Ciências Biológicas e da SaúdeUniversidade Federal do Amapá (UNIFAP)MacapáBrasil

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