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Systematic Parasitology

, 64:117 | Cite as

A new species of Aberrapex Jensen, 2001 (Cestoda: Lecanicephalidea) from Taeniura lymma (Forsskål) (Myliobatiformes: Dasyatidae) from off Sabah, Malaysia

  • K. Jensen
Article

Abstract

A new lecanicephalidean species of Aberrapex Jensen, 2001 is described from the blue-spotted fantail ray Taeniura lymma (Forsskål) collected off the eastern coast of Sabah in Malaysian Borneo. This is the first record of a lecanicephalidean tapeworm from the island of Borneo and the first record of Aberrapex from this host species. A. manjajiae n. sp. is easily distinguished from its two congeners, A. senticosus Jensen, 2001 and A. arrhynchum (Brooks, Mayes & Thorson, 1981) Jensen, 2001, based on its overall smaller size (928–1,971 vs 1,485–6,333 and up to 3,350μm long, respectively) and fewer testes (10–19 vs 20–40 and 18–25, respectively). In addition, A. manjajiae n. sp. is readily distinguished from A. senticosus based on a more anteriorly positioned genital pore (76–85 vs 52–72% of proglottid length from posterior end) and its distal bothridial microthrix pattern. A. manjajiae n. sp. can be further distinguished from A. arrhynchum based on its smaller scolex (82–101 × 119–164 vs 177–186 × 233–326μm). The host distribution of Aberrapex is expanded from the Myliobatidae to include the Dasyatidae.

Keywords

Grade Ethanol Series Apical Organ Vitelline Follicle Genital Atrium United States National Parasite Collection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

I thank Rayner Datuk Stuel Galid, Director of the Department of Fisheries, Sabah, Malaysia for his logistical assistance, as well as Mohd. Tahir Hj. Ahmad, Mohamad Sappan, Aldam Jalil and Maidin Osman from the Semporna Office of the Department of Fisheries, Sabah, Malaysia for their valuable assistance in obtaining specimens. I␣am particularly grateful to Dr␣Janine Caira for organising the collecting in Sabah and for her participation in the fieldwork conducted for this study. I am also grateful to Loren Caira and Dr␣Gavin Naylor for the collection of the hosts, and to Garrett Call for his assistance with specimen preparation. These collections were conducted under permit No. UPE:40/200/19SJ.925 from the Economic Planning Unit in Kuala Lumpur and permit No. JKM 100–24/13/1/223(59) from the Chief Minister’s Department, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia. This work was supported with funds from NSF BS&I grant No. DEB 0103640 to J. N. Caira, G. Naylor, P. Last, J. Stevens and KJ.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the Natural History Museum and Biodiversity Research CenterUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA

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