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Synthese

pp 1–16 | Cite as

Reminiscing together: joint experiences, epistemic groups, and sense of self

  • Axel SeemannEmail author
S.I.: Groups
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Abstract

In this essay, I consider a kind of social group that I call ‘epistemic’. It is constituted by its members’ possession of perceptually grounded common knowledge, which endows them with a particular kind of epistemic authority. This authority, I argue, is invoked in the activity of ‘joint reminiscing’—of remembering together a past jointly experienced event. Joint reminiscing, in turn, plays an important role in the constitution of social and personal identity. The notion of an epistemic group, then, is a concept that helps explain an important aspect of a subject’s understanding of who she is.

Keywords

Groups Joint attention Common knowledge Episodic memory Collective memory 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyBentley UniversityWalthamUSA

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