Advertisement

Synthese

, Volume 191, Issue 16, pp 3919–3934 | Cite as

A psychofunctionalist argument against nonconceptualism

  • Justin TiehenEmail author
Article
  • 136 Downloads

Abstract

In this paper I present a psychofunctionalist argument for conceptualism, the thesis that conscious visual experience is a conceptual state rather than a nonconceptual state. The argument draws on the holistic character of functionalist accounts of mind, together with the “Two Visual Systems Hypothesis” notably defended by Melvyn Goodale and David Milner.

Keywords

Nonconceptual content Concepts Functionalism   Two visual systems hypothesis Holism 

References

  1. Allen, C. (2004). Animal pain. Nous, 38(4), 617–643.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bermudez, J. L. (1998). The paradox of self-consciousness. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  3. Bermudez, J. L. (2007). What is at stake in the debate about nonconceptual content? Philosophical Perspectives, 21(1), 55–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bermudez, J. L., & Cahen, A. (2011). Nonconceptual mental content. In E. Zalta (Ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.Google Scholar
  5. Brewer, B. (1999). Perception and reason. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Brewer, B. (2005). Perceptual experience has conceptual content. In M. Steup & E. Sosa (Eds.), Contemporary debates in epistemology. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  7. Briscoe, R. (2009). Egocentric spatial representation in action and perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 79(2), 423–460.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Byrne, A. (2005). Perception and conceptual content. In M. Steup & E. Sosa (Eds.), Contemporary debates in epistemology (pp. 233–249). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  9. Campbell, J. (2002). Reference and consciousness. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Chalmers, D. (1996). The conscious mind. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Clark, A. (2001). Visual experience and motor action: Are the bonds too tight? Philosophical Review, 110, 495–519.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Crook, R. J., & Walters, E. T. (2011). Nociceptive behavior and physiology of molluscs: Animal welfare implications. ILAR Journal, 52, 185–195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Cussins, A. (1990). The connectionist construction of concepts. In M. Boden (Ed.), The philosophy of artificial intelligence. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Dretske, F. (1995). Naturalizing the mind. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  15. Evans, G. (1982). The varieties of reference. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Gangopadhyay, N., Madary, M., & Spicer, F. (2010). Perception, action, and consciousness: Sensorimotor dynamics, and two visual systems. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Goodale, M., & Milner, D. (2004). Sight unseen. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Heck, R. (2000). Nonconceptual content and the ‘Space of Reasons’. Philosophical Review, 109, 483–523.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Heck, R. (2007). Are there different kinds of content? In J. Cohen & B. McLaughlin (Eds.), Contemporary debates in the philosophy of mind. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  20. Illich, P. A., & Walters, E. T. (1997). Mechanosensory neurons innervating aplysia siphon encode noxious stimuli and display nociceptive sensitization. The Journal of Neuroscience, 17, 459–469.Google Scholar
  21. Jackson, F. (1982). Epiphenomenal qualia. Philosophical Quarterly, 32, 127–136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Kelly, S. D. (2001). Demonstrative concepts and experience. Philosophical Review, 110(3), 397–420.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Laurier, D. (2004). Nonconceptual contents vs. nonconceptual states. Grazer Philosophische Studien, 68, 23–43.Google Scholar
  24. Laurence, S., & Margolis, E. (2012). In E. Margolis, R. Samuels, & S.P. Stich (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Cognitive Science (pp. 291–317). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  25. Levin, J. (2009). “Functionalism”. In E. Zalta (Ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.Google Scholar
  26. Lewis, D. (1970). How to define theoretical terms. Journal of Philosophy, 67, 427–446.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Lewis, D. (1972). Psychophysical and theoretical identifications. Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 50, 249–258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. McDowell, J. (1994). Mind and world. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  29. Milner, D., & Goodale, M. (1995/2006). The visual brain in action (2nd edn). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Milner, D., & Goodale, M. (2008). Two visual systems re-viewed. Neuropsychologia, 46, 774–785.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Milner, D., & Goodale, M. (2010). Cortical visual systems for perception and action. In N. Gangopadhyay, M. Madary, & F. Spicer (Eds.).Google Scholar
  32. Peacocke, C. (1992a). A study of concepts. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  33. Peacocke, C. (2001). Does perception have a nonconceptual content? Journal of Philosophy, 98, 239–264.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Roskies, A. L. (2008). A new argument for nonconceptual content. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 76: 633–659.Google Scholar
  35. Roskies, A. (2010). ‘That’ responses doesn’t work: Against a demonstrative defense of conceptualism. Nous, 44, 112–134.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Speaks, J. (2005). Is there a problem about nonconceptual content? Philosophical Review, 114, 359–398.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Stalnaker, R. (1998). What might nonconceptual content be? In E. Villanueva (Ed.), Concepts. Ridgeview: Atascadero.Google Scholar
  38. Toribio, J. (2008). State versus content: The unfair trial of perceptual nonconceptualism. Erkenntnis, 69(3), 351–361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Tye, M. (2006). Nonconceptual content, richness, and fineness of grain. In T. G. Szabo & J. Hawthorne (Eds.), Perceptual experience. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Puget SoundTacomaUSA

Personalised recommendations